Booking an Accessible Bedroom

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railiner

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What part of "wheeled" is confusing to you?

Rollator is one of the listed wheeled options. Non-wheeled mobility aids ("cane, walker, crutches, etc.") have their own category.
After you check the box on the booking page for "Disabled" and then click "Find Trains", a dialog comes up that asks for your type of disability. I think Walker is one of the options. Try a fake booking for an LD train to see if the Accessible Bedroom shows up under Rooms.
There isn't really much difference between a standard walker, and one that has two wheels, so far as a mobility aid goes. A four wheeled rollator often adds a seat, some are designed to be also used as a transport wheelchair.
 

MccfamschoolMom

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Non-wheeled mobility aids ("cane, walker, crutches, etc.") have their own category.
I have a cane, but only need it when my lower legs are severely painful or swollen -- and at those times, I'd prefer not travelling at all, so I wouldn't seek to book an accessible bedroom myself. Certainly those who need to use canes/walkers/crutches on a regular basis should be able to book accessible bedrooms on Amtrak's sleeper cars, though.
 

AmtrakBlue

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I have a cane, but only need it when my lower legs are severely painful or swollen -- and at those times, I'd prefer not travelling at all, so I wouldn't seek to book an accessible bedroom myself. Certainly those who need to use canes/walkers/crutches on a regular basis should be able to book accessible bedrooms on Amtrak's sleeper cars, though.
Though canes, folding walkers & crutches can fit in roomettes & bedrooms. On the super liner there are 4 roomettes & the family room on the lower level.
The accessible room provides room for wheelchairs, scooters & rotators.
 
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Though canes, folding walkers & crutches can fit in roomettes & bedrooms. On the super liner there are 4 roomettes & the family room.
The accessible room provides room for wheelchairs, scooters & rotators.
I'm assuming you mean "on the lower level," and your point is well taken - as long as those people don't need to use the stairs, any lower level room should suffice. There might be a rare exception where it might be difficult to use the restroom,
 

AmtrakBlue

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I'm assuming you mean "on the lower level," and your point is well taken - as long as those people don't need to use the stairs, any lower level room should suffice.
I was thinking it - but my fingers didn't follow my thinking. Fixed it. Thanks.
 
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Though canes, folding walkers & crutches can fit in roomettes & bedrooms. On the super liner there are 4 roomettes & the family room on the lower level.
The accessible room provides room for wheelchairs, scooters & rotators.
But a person who needs a cane or walker may not have enough lower body strength and mobility to get in and out of bed with that tiny space between the bed and the door and nothing to grab onto in a roomette.

I would like to see Amtrak offer regular bedrooms to handicapped people at the same rate as the accessible room. I think my small scooter might fit down the hallway to a Viewliner bedroom, but I would have to disassemble it in the hallway and carry the parts into the room. The disassembled parts should fit in the space freed up by folding the chair.
 

MccfamschoolMom

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But a person who needs a cane or walker may not have enough lower body strength and mobility to get in and out of bed with that tiny space between the bed and the door and nothing to grab onto in a roomette.
On those days when I have to resort to using a cane, lower body strength and mobility are certainly issues. Picking my feet up to climb even just a few steps at home or at work on days when I need a cane is a major undertaking, especially with the steps from the street to the sidewalk in front of the office where I work, which have no railing to grab. (At church, some railings were installed on the altar steps, as we've had a few trip & fall incidents when retired priests come to serve Mass.) In a small space without grab bars (like the shower) when my legs hurt or the floor is too slick for stable footing, I try to brace against the walls; I don't know how well that would work in a roomette, though, even in the lower bunk. (And forget about trying to climb into an upper bunk if one needs a mobility assistance device!)
 

Just-Thinking-51

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I would like to see Amtrak offer regular bedrooms to handicapped people at the same rate as the accessible room. I think my small scooter might fit down the hallway to a Viewliner bedroom, but I would have to disassemble it in the hallway and carry the parts into the room. The disassembled parts should fit in the space freed up by folding the chair.
Once you break down your scooter it becomes baggage. Sorry you should not get a bedroom at a roomette price because you need additional space for baggage. Slippery slope IMHO. While the ADA is a poorly written law and one size does not fit all when you are talking about it. The current policy is written and while we may see multiple issues with technical issues. It’s at least written starting point.

I was recently in a Viewliner 2 H room. A last minute upgrade. Sorry not impressed. It work for me, but not very well. I upgraded due to work, travel stress, and want more space. Which I payed heavily for. The flat spot on the wheel below the room was no extra charge, it seemed. The room setup was lacking and really prevented me from have room to stretch out. (6’6”) Redo that little closet, cut some of the mass from the side of the sink, then I would fit better. Oh and fix the door, and come to terms with the crews about where that ladder is stored. Yes I am that passenger.
 
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Once you break down your scooter it becomes baggage. Sorry you should not get a bedroom at a roomette price because you need additional space for baggage. Slippery slope IMHO. While the ADA is a poorly written law and one size does not fit all when you are talking about it. The current policy is written and while we may see multiple issues with technical issues. It’s at least written starting point.

I was recently in a Viewliner 2 H room. A last minute upgrade. Sorry not impressed. It work for me, but not very well. I upgraded due to work, travel stress, and want more space. Which I payed heavily for. The flat spot on the wheel below the room was no extra charge, it seemed. The room setup was lacking and really prevented me from have room to stretch out. (6’6”) Redo that little closet, cut some of the mass from the side of the sink, then I would fit better. Oh and fix the door, and come to terms with the crews about where that ladder is stored. Yes I am that passenger.
On VL II H-room:

I think the bed is the same length as a regular bedroom.

Yes, the location is bad for wheel noise. It's made worse by an air vent in the door that's covered by nothing more than a metal screen. All the noise from the vestibule comes into the room. The VL I H-room door does not have that vent, or it's covered by some material to dampen the noise.

Mobility aids are excepted from baggage limits and charges. It shouldn't matter whether they're whole or broken down. I know current policy does not allow substitution of a bedroom for an H-room, but it would be nice if they did allow it, especially when recovering from a cancellation or delay where all H-rooms are full.
 

Just-Thinking-51

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The vent is neat how you can position yourself and watch quite clearly the people walking by in the hallway. Not a well thought out design.

I did notice and liked the emergency exit in the ‘end of car doors’. That’s a good idea.
 
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One thing that people often fail to recognize is how different disabilities present different challenges and assisting one may make it more difficult for another. I remember post broken hip, the difficulty my mother had with many toilets because they were set low to ease transfer. At home we had the frame of a commode for her to assist with getting up. That would be a huge hindrance in a wheelchair scenario wher bars and rails get in the way.
 
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