Boston, MA

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Orie

Service Attendant
Joined
Sep 1, 2014
Messages
187
Hi all,

I have a day off from work next week and I decided it would be nice to visit somewhere new, so I booked a one day round trip on the Acela (using my new Amtrak card with double days, if I'm doing the math right, I'll get 4,000 points out of the Acela vs ~500 for the NER). I do intend to go back for longer than just seven hours sometime, but for the purposes of spending a single day day off on the rails, I had a few questions.

Biggest question: Does anyone have some good ideas for what to do in such a short time span? I have seven hours, from 10am (if we arrive on schedule) until 5pm. I'm really open to anything, I'm just looking for tips on the best way to fit the most into such a short time period. I love museums, history, or just visiting landmarks. Whatever works!

Secondly: Is the Boston subway safe for the most part? Any areas to avoid on it? That's how I intend to get around for the most part. I've lived in NYC for 20 years so I'm not someone who gets scared of Subway systems without cause, but I also know there are some mass transit systems in this country to avoid.

I also noticed there isn't one of these threads for Boston either, so if anyone has any general info they want to share for someone in the future that may be taking a longer trip, feel free to!

Thanks a lot!
 

Acela150

Conductor
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Messages
8,732
My suggestion is go to the "T" Ticket office and buy a One Day Pass. I do it once a year and ride the subway/trolley system. Which is very safe. I will take train 66 then buy a one day pass and ride as much of the system as I can. I've managed to get all four major routes ridden in a day. Not acing the system in a day. But last time I did it I was on the 430 Acela. Which at the time was the last Acela set that would go south of NYP. What I did that day was a lot of riding.. I ended up riding the Green Lines "C" line to Cleveland Circle and walked the half mile or so to the Reservoir Station on the "D" line and rode that back into the city. Their is plenty to do!
 

Orie

Service Attendant
Joined
Sep 1, 2014
Messages
187
My suggestion is go to the "T" Ticket office and buy a One Day Pass. I do it once a year and ride the subway/trolley system. Which is very safe. I will take train 66 then buy a one day pass and ride as much of the system as I can. I've managed to get all four major routes ridden in a day. Not acing the system in a day. But last time I did it I was on the 430 Acela. Which at the time was the last Acela set that would go south of NYP. What I did that day was a lot of riding.. I ended up riding the Green Lines "C" line to Cleveland Circle and walked the half mile or so to the Reservoir Station on the "D" line and rode that back into the city. Their is plenty to do!
Thanks! I'm sure I'll be spending lots of time on the subway.
 

MARC Rider

Conductor
Joined
Apr 5, 2011
Messages
1,784
If you only have a day and want to see the historic sites, I would suggest walking the Freedom Trail.

It's about 2.5 miles from Boston Common to the Bunker Hill Monument and goes by all of the places you read about in the history books. From South Station, take the Red Line to Park St., and head up the hill on Boston Common to the State House and the Robert Gould Shaw/54th Regiment Memorial where the trail starts, marked by a red brick line in the sidewalk. Just follow the red brick lines, you'll pass by or near the Old State House, Fanueil Hall, Quincy Market, the Holocaust Memorial, the North End, Old North Church (of Paul Revere fame), the USS Constitution, ending at he Bunker Hill Monument in Charleston. From there, you can either retrace your steps or walk another 15 minutes to the Community College station on the Orange Line and ride back to downtown. (Get off at Downtown Crossing to get back to South Station. You an either change to the Red Line, or it's so close, you can just go upstairs and walk.) In addition to the historical sites, you get a nice view of the twisty streets and historic architecture of old Boston, so much unlike most other cities in the United States.

Lots of places to eat along the way. Hanover St. in the North End is Boston's Little Italy and has more pasta palaces than you can shake a stick at. The Boston Public Market has a lot of stalls and eateries. If you stop by the Omni Parker House Hotel on Tremont St., you can get the original Boston Cream Pie. Lots of other places, just check your google maps.
 
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