Caltrain Electrification Delayed to 2024

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jis

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From the Mass Transit Magazine:

Stakeholders joined Caltrain to celebrate successfully completing all 3,092 foundations for the new overhead catenary system (OCS) that will support electrified Caltrain service.

The 51-mile Caltrain Electrification project will be the first 25KV OCS system on the west coast and will provide power to the new state-of-the-art electric trains that will start arriving on the corridor in spring 2022.

......

Caltrain celebrates installation of final foundation for electrification project
 

GiantsFan

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Pretty exciting! Ive been driving up and down the peninsula recently and a lot of the catenary looks finished.

There was also movement on the DTX downtown extension that will eventually carry the electrified trains into downtown SF's transbay terminal, it was announced the project entered the FTA capital investment grants funding program
 

slasher-fun

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So... this happened. Apparently, electrification crew were on the tracks while trains were still running.


FNglU1DVUAEvuE8
 

west point

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Somebody messed up. Who, only time will tell? Dispatch., engineer, construction crew, equipment failure causing a sudden fouling, (blown tire for examples), distraction, signal failure of new installation, or another item.
 

George Harris

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This would have been a completely different situation if the train had been northbound. These trains are push-pull with the engine on the south end. If northbound it would have been with a coach leading and with that the near certainty of multiple fatalities in the leading car, probably including the engineer. My thought when riding this service, which I did regularly several years ago, is that if you see the engineer coming out of the cab and running down the aisle, don't ask, just get up and do likewise, because we are probably about to hit something.

I will make no guesses as to who and what was wrong here. It is certain that there will be an NTSB investigation. We may get some reasonably good and maybe even right answers earlier, but when the NTSB gets through every rock has been overturned.
 

west point

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Hopefully Caltrain has some spare poles in the replacement pipeline.
We have assumed that the delay is because of parts but is that really the problem?
The oil shortages are going to cause many persons to ride transit. IMO the oil shortages are not going to change in the next several years. Although not much gasoline will be saved but everyone who can use transit is maybe a 5-gallon not used.

Parts and spare parts are needed. Maybe time for the president to invoke the production act to speed up parts for transit and Amtrak?
 
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The writer of that article seems to be obsessed about "belchy" Diesels. I guess she doesn't consider the fact that one train pulled by a "belchy" Diesel takes a few hundred cars off the road.
He has a point about concentrations of diesel locomotives in commuter service. When I started riding MARC in 2000, nearly all of the locomotives except for some AEM-7s on the Penn Line were Tier 0 (or Tier less than zero, i.e. "unregulated") diesels. The trainshed at Washington Union Sation was a smoky, smelly inferno, especially on a warm day. Going from the gate to the train was like running a gauntlet. I would somehow try to breath as little as possible while walking as fast as I could to get in front of everybody to snag a good seat. If I rode a train pulled by a diesel and the wind was right, I could see clouds of black smoke blowing by the window (which was fortunately sealed.) Occasionally in the B&P tunnel, you'd get the whiff of diesel inside the coaches.

Fortunately, as EPA tightened diesel emissions requirements and they got rid of the older locomotives, there have been great improvements on this front. The Chargers are particularly nice, having both diesel particulate emissions filters and SCR to get rid of the NOx. Unfortunately, even on the Penn Line, everything is diesel, I think there's only 1 or 2 MARC electric locomotives left.
 

Shawn Ryu

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Probably a dumb question but what will happened to Bombadier bilevel cars? Gallery cars they can retire for sure, but bilevel cars seems too young to retire.

Any chance they get electric locomotives (used from other agencies like NJ Transit or SEPTA)?
 

jis

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Probably a dumb question but what will happened to Bombadier bilevel cars? Gallery cars they can retire for sure, but bilevel cars seems too young to retire.

Any chance they get electric locomotives (used from other agencies like NJ Transit or SEPTA)?
I thought they were going to keep some of them for their Gilroy service, and get rid of the Gallery Cars.

Of course I am sure any surplus bi-levels can be palmed off to TriRail or Sunrail in Florida as they grow too. We are talking a total of 41 cars all told.
 

Shawn Ryu

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I thought they were going to keep some of them for their Gilroy service, and get rid of the Gallery Cars.

Of course I am sure any surplus bi-levels can be palmed off to TriRail or Sunrail in Florida as they grow too. We are talking a total of 41 cars all told.
Ah so they are only electrifying to San Jose.
 
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