CPAP in a superliner roomette

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danasgoodstuff

Lead Service Attendant
Joined
Jun 23, 2021
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375
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PDX
I left mine at home when i was gone for a month earlier this year - fear of losing or damaging it. If you do take it, bring tape sine the roomette plug-ins tend to be a little loose.
 

NorthShore

Conductor
Joined
Sep 3, 2013
Messages
1,276
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Chicago
Not a CPAP, but a friend with a ventilator rode in a handicapped sleeper room a couple of years ago. I'm not sure how they set it up, exactly. It's possible it stayed attached to her wheelchair.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2011
Messages
5,020
Location
Baltimore. MD
Because there's only one outlet in a Superliner roomette, placement of the device is a little tricky, although they have gotten smaller and lighter over the years. In most cases, the outlet is by my feet, and there's enough power cord that I can put it on the step by my head. It works pretty well, although if the train loses power (which happens sometimes), it will not work. There are batteries available, and compact travel models, which might be worth looking into if you travel a lot.
 

zephyr17

Engineer
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
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6,610
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Washington State
I ride with a CPAP regularly in Superliner roomettes, have for years, and have it pretty much down. The CPAP goes on the "step" regardless of which direction the bed is set up. The hose is long enough. The "step" is diagonally across from the outlet, so power is a challenge. My solution is a power strip that I place behind the table next to window that also serves my various chargers. I plug an extension cord into that and run it beneath the window and tuck it into the gap between the seat cushion and head rest. I duct tape (and I will refuse to engage in the gaffers tape discussion) the power strip cord and the extension cord to the walls to make sure it stays out of the way and won't interfere with putting the bed up or down. It pretty much goes around the edge of the room on the window side. I carry a small container of distilled water. I do not fill up the CPAP water reservoir more than half full onboard.

The placement and power solution is different in Viewliner roomettes.

I don't have a travel battery, and endure the loss of power in Spokane regularly. I may get one in the future.

Upon boarding, I beaver around for about 10 minutes setting it all up.

Feel free to DM me with questions.
 
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wrowland

Train Attendant
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Aug 15, 2022
Messages
27
Location
Indiana
I ride with a CPAP regularly in Superliner roomettes, have for years, and have it pretty much down. The CPAP goes on the "step" regardless of which direction the bed is set up. The hose is long enough. The "step" is diagonally across from the outlet, so power is a challenge. My solution is a power strip that I place behind the table next to window that also serves my various chargers. I plug an extension cord into that and run it beneath the window and tuck it into the gap between the seat cushion and head rest. I duct tape (and I will refuse to engage in the gaffers tape discussion) the power strip cord and the extension cord to the walls to make sure it stays out of the way and won't interfere with putting the bed up or down. It pretty much goes around the edge of the room on the window side. I carry a small container of distilled water. I do not fill up the CPAP water reservoir more than half full onboard.

The placement and power solution is different in Viewliner roomettes.

I don't have a travel battery, and endure the loss of power in Spokane regularly. I may get one in the future.

Upon boarding, I beaver around for about 10 minutes setting it all up.

Feel free to DM me with questions.
Many thanks! I have more confidence now bringing it. Great advice on not overfilling!
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Messages
853
A CPAP will enable you to use the H room as per Amtrak rules. I had to use one for an extended period after a sinus surgery. It’s a lot bigger room for theoretically the same price as a roomette and it has 2 outlets. You’ll have to call reservations so they can put it in the notes. Might help a lot if you don’t have a travel size cpap. Two trips on the SWC and CZ in 2018 no one batted an eye. Just throwing that out there.

One other point if you have a loud machine the H room is great since you have no neighbors at all. You‘re by the toilets and showers which was not an issue for us at all.
 
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Stremba

Train Attendant
Joined
Apr 27, 2022
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Crafton
I have used a CPAP in both Superliners and Viewliners. I just take an extension cord (which also helps with charging electronics as well). The roomette is small enough for the extension to reach the outlet from anywhere in the room. Usually I just set it up on the steps, although my son is usually in the upper berth. He tends to get up after me, though, so that has not caused any issues.
 

zephyr17

Engineer
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Washington State
I've never had a problem with a full size CPAP in any roomette flavor, Superliner, Viewliner, or VIA's classic ones (which, it must be said, are a bit challenging). Of course, they are generally smaller these days, anyway, but had no issue with them in the past.

Didn't know that a CPAP entitled one to an H room. I thought those were restricted to the mobility impaired (until 2 weeks out), and obstructive sleep apnea is no mobility impairment. In any case, I've had a CPAP since 1992 and have been traveling in roomettes the whole time. I would not feel at all good about grabbing an H room and possibly denying it to someone who actually needs its accessibility features.
 

Stremba

Train Attendant
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Apr 27, 2022
Messages
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Location
Crafton
I've never had a problem with a full size CPAP in any roomette flavor, Superliner, Viewliner, or VIA's classic ones (which, it must be said, are a bit challenging). Of course, they are generally smaller these days, anyway, but had no issue with them in the past.

Didn't know that a CPAP entitled one to an H room. I thought those were restricted to the mobility impaired (until 2 weeks out), and obstructive sleep apnea is no mobility impairment. In any case, I've had a CPAP since 1992 and have been traveling in roomettes the whole time. I would not feel at all good about grabbing an H room and possibly denying it to someone who actually needs its accessibility features.
I’m with you. I never would even have thought about booking the H bedroom because of my CPAP. It really isn’t a big deal to use it a roomette, and I would feel like I had taken the H room away from someone who truly needs it when I really do not.
 
Joined
Aug 30, 2021
Messages
1
Location
Seattle, WA
This is guaranteed to happen in Spokane, Albany and San Antonio, where the respective trains are combined or split. The power usually isn't off for more than 20 minutes, and in the case of Albany, it's during the time when the CPAP user is awake anyway.
I actually use a travel size CPAP machine when traveling (unless between February and May, when I must use the full size CPAP, I need the 90 day reading for CDL medical exam purposes)..

My travel CPAP does include a battery backup, so when the power goes out in Spokane for the split/combine, my CPAP continues to run, just running off the battery instead of the AC power

Just need to bring a power strip for all of your electrical connections. The travel CPAP fits at the window still next to window. The full sized one has to go under the bed (lower bed of roomette).

I have a more severe case of OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea) , so if I don't use it, I have unrestful sleep. Those with not as severe case of OSA might be able to get away from the CPAP machine for a day or two.
 

wrowland

Train Attendant
Joined
Aug 15, 2022
Messages
27
Location
Indiana
A CPAP will enable you to use the H room as per Amtrak rules. I had to use one for an extended period after a sinus surgery. It’s a lot bigger room for theoretically the same price as a roomette and it has 2 outlets. You’ll have to call reservations so they can put it in the notes. Might help a lot if you don’t have a travel size cpap. Two trips on the SWC and CZ in 2018 no one batted an eye. Just throwing that out there.

One other point if you have a loud machine the H room is great since you have no neighbors at all. You‘re by the toilets and showers which was not an issue for us at all.
I would feel bad too about taking the room knowing I am mobile, fat, but still mobile 😀
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
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NYC/Queens
The CPAP would likely qualify one for the disability discount, but the current website wording on the H room holds it for those who need wheeled mobility devices.

Who May Reserve Accessible Room Accommodations​

Up until 14 days prior to the departure of each train from its origin city, reservations for accessible bedrooms may be made only for passengers with a disability who travel with a wheeled mobility device.
Passengers booking an accessible bedroom accommodation will be required to certify that they require one or more of the accessible features of the accessible room accommodation in order to book and receive the discount. Passengers are not required to indicate the type of disability they have but only that they require the accessible features due to a disability. Conductors on trains with accessible room accommodations will provide a self-certification form to be completed by the passenger.
Within 14 days prior to a train departure from its origin city, and if all other Bedroom and Family bedrooms have been reserved, accessible bedroom are made available to all passengers on a first-come, first-served basis. For this reason, we urge you to make your reservations as far in advance of travel as possible.
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
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NYC/Queens
I've seen plenty of folks brought onto trains into accessible accommodations and have never seen it either. But that is what it says on the website. I didn't even consider that, I was just posting the section in response to an earlier poster that the use of a cpap machine would make one eligible for an H room, which is clearly in conflict with the stated policy.
 

Kenneth

Service Attendant
Joined
Oct 14, 2011
Messages
107
Location
Southern Illinois
I always take my CPAP unit. In a Bedroom I place it on the sink. In a roomette I place it on the top step. and I always bring an extension cord. Never had an issue.
 

Railroad Bill

Buckeye Train Watcher
AU Supporting Member
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Jun 28, 2007
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3,822
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Northern Ohio
Wife and I both use Cpaps on the train. Always need extension cord when we are in the bunks top and bottom. When I travel alone it easily fits at lower end of bed and I have a super long hose that works well. I do not sleep well without it over the past 3 years I have used it. My cardiologist says sleep apnea is a major cause of heart issues in her practice. Wear your mask and take your pills. Live long and ride trains.
 

wallylegs

Train Attendant
Joined
Jan 28, 2017
Messages
20
Many trips, CPAP has always come along with me, I am only short so I just put it on thebed. I use a power strip so I have enough plugs.
I dont use a humidifier unless it is freezing cold or I am in a really dry environmant, it can be both, so that is no issue.
I was aware it was off for a bit when I was on the Empire Builder, but it was not for long. They really are not an impediment to travel.
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2020
Messages
4
I’ve used my full size airsense 10 with humidifier in a roomette, but getting an airsense mini was the best $700 I’ve spent, just for not having to schlep it around, but I actually used it in coach last time, slept way better than I usually do.
 
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