Cruise ship discussion

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Ferroequinologist

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My first plane trip as a child, an Eastern Airlines DC-8 from Idlewild to Miami. My parents dressed me in a shirt and tie. Times have changed. More recently, cruises have become much less formal, dress codes for most meals very relaxed. Formal night is now jacket and tie, not formal attire. The number of people who like it the old way is not considered large enough to support that as the standard, it still exists, but is more of a niche market now.
Cunard, especially trans-Atlantic crossings, still have a dress code and two or three black tie nights per crossing. All other nights men are expected to wear a dark suit or jacket. If not, they have to eat in the self-service restaurant.

MODERATOR NOTE: this comment and the ones following it were split from a discussion regarding Amtrak Viewliner Restrooms.
 
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PVD

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Like I said, it still exists, but is nowhere near as common. Of course a transatlantic crossing is generally a liner crossing, not a cruise.
 

me_little_me

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Like I said, it still exists, but is nowhere near as common. Of course a transatlantic crossing is generally a liner crossing, not a cruise.
Only with Cunard. On the other hand, we considered our transatlantic cruise on Celebrity to be the best we ever had. It was 14 days so not a direct route and had 3 stops before arrival in the UK. It was as much a part of the vacation as Amtrak used to be. And it was as cheap as Cunard for comparable rooms as well as being without the pretentiousness and snobbery. Cunard IMHO is for the rich to show off their money as well as their desire to get to Europe in as short a time as possible without flying.
 

PVD

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That's part of the point, the broader market has moved away from what used to be common. Cruises (before Covid) have become increasingly popular, point to point crossings are almost gone.
 

railiner

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Cunard IMHO is for the rich to show off their money as well as their desire to get to Europe in as short a time as possible without flying.
Only partially....the QM2 is capable of doing a NY-Soton crossing in just 5 days, but they now do it in 7 or 8 days, because people want the longer experience, and because slowing down saves a huge amount of fuel...
 

PVD

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The fuel has a lot to do with it. Cunard is owned by Carnival, they only stand on Cunard tradition if it makes them money.
 

Palmland

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Just as many of us take a plane one way and return on an LD train, I wish Cruise Lines would do the same. I guess it makes logistics easier for them, but I do think there would be a market for it.

I suspect that is partly why there are still a few transatlantic crossings with Cunard and positioning moves by others. You get the best of the 'it's about the journey, not the destination' philosophy and an extended stay at your destination.
 
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PVD

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It isn't just logistics, there are laws about foreign flagged and crewed vessels and what they can do out of US ports.
 

railiner

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PVD

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Exactly, that's why those still exist, but regular cruises leaving from and returning to the same port are closed loop. The same passengers that boarded are expected to disembark when they return.
 

Winecliff Station

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Only with Cunard. On the other hand, we considered our transatlantic cruise on Celebrity to be the best we ever had. It was 14 days so not a direct route and had 3 stops before arrival in the UK. It was as much a part of the vacation as Amtrak used to be. And it was as cheap as Cunard for comparable rooms as well as being without the pretentiousness and snobbery. Cunard IMHO is for the rich to show off their money as well as their desire to get to Europe in as short a time as possible without flying.
I am nowhere near rich but I enjoy Cunard for the tradition and liner history that it promotes on board.....although granted since the selling of the QE2 that has dropped and Cunard is becoming more of a mainstream cruise line. I'm kind of a liner geek so I get there may not be the same appeal to everyone. For example there was a lecturer named Bill Miller who did presentations on the history of not only Cunard but the whole liner industry of all nations. They also had ship tours where the guide would bring you around while entertaining with some in depth passenger experiences from over the years of liner travel. If by showing off money you mean the Queens Grill, yeah the segregation is unfortunate, but steerage has come a long way since a hundred years ago. ;)

That being said, I compare Amtrak to liner travel all the time as my plan for retirement is surface travel only....the more flying becomes unbearable, and when time is no longer a factor, there's no need to get in a tiny sardine box where you have to spoon with the passenger in front of you when they recline their seat

Trains are like ships in the sense that you feel they are bringing the world to you, rather than the other way around. I remember taking the QV from NY to San Francisco and being in the Golden Lion pub where I saw the Statue of Liberty through the window at our table. A week later, I saw the walls of the Panama Canal through the same window. It is the same for me on a train, especially in a bedroom, as the view outside the same room changes and brings new places to me.
 

Ferroequinologist

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You are correct. Cunard is now the exception. Also the Queen Mary2 is the LAST of the ocean liners, all others are cruise ships.
 

Ferroequinologist

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I am nowhere near rich but I enjoy Cunard for the tradition and liner history that it promotes on board.....although granted since the selling of the QE2 that has dropped and Cunard is becoming more of a mainstream cruise line. I'm kind of a liner geek so I get there may not be the same appeal to everyone. For example there was a lecturer named Bill Miller who did presentations on the history of not only Cunard but the whole liner industry of all nations. They also had ship tours where the guide would bring you around while entertaining with some in depth passenger experiences from over the years of liner travel. If by showing off money you mean the Queens Grill, yeah the segregation is unfortunate, but steerage has come a long way since a hundred years ago. ;)

That being said, I compare Amtrak to liner travel all the time as my plan for retirement is surface travel only....the more flying becomes unbearable, and when time is no longer a factor, there's no need to get in a tiny sardine box where you have to spoon with the passenger in front of you when they recline their seat

Trains are like ships in the sense that you feel they are bringing the world to you, rather than the other way around. I remember taking the QV from NY to San Francisco and being in the Golden Lion pub where I saw the Statue of Liberty through the window at our table. A week later, I saw the walls of the Panama Canal through the same window. It is the same for me on a train, especially in a bedroom, as the view outside the same room changes and brings new places to me.
I don't think Cunard is like most cruise lines. There is a great deal more tradition and formality on the Cunard ships.
 

me_little_me

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That's part of the point, the broader market has moved away from what used to be common. Cruises (before Covid) have become increasingly popular, point to point crossings are almost gone.
Point to point crossings still exist. Transpacific and transatlantic crossings, however, are used to reposition ships so e.g. Caribbean in the winter from the U.S. and Europe in the summer from Europe. Similarly, west coast of US and Pacific at different times depending on port of departure/return.
 
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