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DryCreek

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Two of Carnival's Fantasy Class ships just went to the breakers in Turkey.
There are numerous You Tube clips showing them being grounded. They are right next to two older Royal Caribbean ships.
I think that more from the cruise fleet may be heading to the breakers in Indonesia and India.
 

Dakota 400

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Found on the 'net...



And lots more...."google is your friend"....;)
There's more that you found than I thought. The company with which I dealt is not one of those you mentioned.
 

Dakota 400

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Two of Carnival's Fantasy Class ships just went to the breakers in Turkey.
There are numerous You Tube clips showing them being grounded. They are right next to two older Royal Caribbean ships.
I think that more from the cruise fleet may be heading to the breakers in Indonesia and India.

Four of the eight Fantasy Class ships are expected to be returned to service at some point of time. Two are in cold layup as I understand with no clear plans by Carnival Cruise Line as to their future.

It would be interesting--at least to me--to know what basis CCL is using to decide which of these ships to remove from service and which ones to "save". Two of those, Carnival Paradise and Carnival Elation, have the more modern azipod propulsion system, so their preservation for future use is understandable. Yet, Carnival Ecstasy is now the 2nd oldest ship in Carnival Cruise Lines fleet and is expected to return to service while a younger sister is at the breakers now.
 

tgstubbs1

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One article I read said they seemed to favor larger ships. They have really grown in size. I'm pretty sure they have other criteria, too.
 

DryCreek

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Four of the eight Fantasy Class ships are expected to be returned to service at some point of time. Two are in cold layup as I understand with no clear plans by Carnival Cruise Line as to their future.

It would be interesting--at least to me--to know what basis CCL is using to decide which of these ships to remove from service and which ones to "save". Two of those, Carnival Paradise and Carnival Elation, have the more modern azipod propulsion system, so their preservation for future use is understandable. Yet, Carnival Ecstasy is now the 2nd oldest ship in Carnival Cruise Lines fleet and is expected to return to service while a younger sister is at the breakers now.
Balconies. It's all about the number of balconies a ship has to offer.
While the Azipods are greater and offer slightly better maneuverability, they are slightly less reliable. The Ecstacy is an OK ship - we sailed on her in 2010. But, she had more balcony rooms (aft, added to the sides) than the Fantasy did.
 

Ziv

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I was a week from booking a trip on a RCCL cruise ship from Puerto Rico to 5 islands (St. Thomas, St. Maarten, St. John, Antigua and St. Lucia) and then back to PR in the middle of March. That week was the last time I ate in a cafe for several months, and it was also the week I started wearing a mask. Hard to believe how life has changed, for the worse.
On 9/11 though, it is hard not to think back to the world before 9/11 with a sad feeling of loss of innocence.
Still wish that I had gotten that cruise in a month earlier!
 

Maglev

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Funny that I come to this thread and see mention of the only cruise ship I have ever sailed on, the Ecstacy. We had a Veranda cabin for a three- or four-night cruise to Ensenada. It was in fact shortly after 9-11, and we were buzzed by fighter jets twice during the cruise.

My first wife also sailed on the Hawaii interisland cruise on the SS Constitution. She and her daughter were originally assigned an inside cabin with bunks, but they complained and were upgraded to twin beds with a porthole. I saw their (very sparse) cabin and had lunch on the ship while their cruise was in Kahului, and another time had dinner on the ship (I was living on Maui then).
 

Dakota 400

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On 9/11 though, it is hard not to think back to the world before 9/11 with a sad feeling of loss of innocence.
I agree. 9/11 was a societal changer. 2020 is another one as well.

While I was only a child and teenager during the 1950's, playing the song sung by Ronnie Milsap Back in the Fifties--Another Time, Another Place is comforting to me. It was a time that seemed so uncomplicated, so good.

Then, the Sixties arrived. And, the world, it seems to me, has been in one turmoil after another ever since.
 

tgstubbs1

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Balconies mean the cruise line can get more revenue than from "just" an outside cabin.
I guess cruises were doing great business before the pandemic, even though there seemed to be rotavirus outbreaks from time to time, and drunks(?) falling overboard.
People really seem to like them, I'm sure they'll be flocking back in droves when things are back to normal.
 

railiner

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I'm sure having "withdrawal pains". My last cruise (Antartica) ended in March. My July 2020 cruise was of course, canceled. I am hopefully optimistic that my end of July, 2021 cruise goes as scheduled....
 

Ferroequinologist

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Point to point crossings still exist. Transpacific and transatlantic crossings, however, are used to reposition ships so e.g. Caribbean in the winter from the U.S. and Europe in the summer from Europe. Similarly, west coast of US and Pacific at different times depending on port of departure/return.
Cunard's Queen Mary 2 has a regular schedule of Trans-Atlantic crossings. They are not transitions.
 

anumberone

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I was in one of the hoard of small boats that watched the Queen Mary come through the Long Beach Breakwall at the end her finale cruise. Sad day!
 

PVD

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QM2 is unique in that it was purpose built as a liner with crossings in mind, rather than as a cruise ship.
 

Dakota 400

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My last cruise (Antartica) ended in March
Well, at least you were able to complete it before the cruise industry shut down.

If that would happen to be your last cruise for awhile, at least to would have been a good one. (Mine was to Antarctica!) On what ship did you sail?
 

me_little_me

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QM2 is unique in that it was purpose built as a liner with crossings in mind, rather than as a cruise ship.
Correct. That's why I didn't link it with cruise ships. It doesn't cruise. Basically, it's like the old fashioned transportation in the days before transatlantic air service. Mostly, it does straight port to/from port from one port in a country without intermediate stops in as short a reasonable time as it can. So, transatlantic US to UK is 7 days vs as much as twice that on cruise ships. You don't take Cunard for leisurely traveling and for on-board circuses.

So when Ferroequinologist corrected me by commenting that Cunard runs crossings, he is correct but I didn't consider them as a "cruise ship" because that's not how people think of cruise ships. In fact, we canceled a Cunard return of a European trip because, in our minds, it would have been no fun but just a bunch of old people showing how rich they are by dressing up at nightly formal dinners and going to elevator music concerts and boring lectures by unemployed college lecturers about the sites one actually sees when riding trains.

It actually would be a better counterpart to Amtrak than the cruise lines would be. Transportation with amenities rather than amenities with transport.
 

DryCreek

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Well, at least you were able to complete it before the cruise industry shut down.

If that would happen to be your last cruise for awhile, at least to would have been a good one. (Mine was to Antarctica!) On what ship did you sail?
Well, while you weren't directing that question to me - I thought that I'd chip in anyway.

We finished our 7 day Western Caribbean in late February. We had a great time! Much better than we expected given the huge size of the Vista Class ships. While others complained about crowds, we seldom ran into that issue. We did spend a good amount of time on the balcony or relaxing on the Serenity Deck. Or, just strolling around and being amazed by the size and cleanliness of that ship.

We sailed on the Carnival Vista, out of Galveston. Had a cove balcony on that trip. Now the wife is spoiled and insists that is the only way to go. Very private, low, and near the water. The other ship that does the Eastern Caribbean with Key West (the itinerary I want to sail) doesn't have the cove balconies (is it the Freedom?).
Quandary.

Anyway, if they had a booking for November, we'd be on it. Without a doubt.
 

railiner

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Well, at least you were able to complete it before the cruise industry shut down.

If that would happen to be your last cruise for awhile, at least to would have been a good one. (Mine was to Antarctica!) On what ship did you sail?
We were on the last cruise of Hurtigruten's splendid hybrid expedition ship, Roald Amundsen, before the pandemic shut everything down. It was supposed to last 17 nights, but we got a 'bonus' extension of nine more nights, trying to find a port to accept us...it's a long story, but in a nutshell, we had a wonderful cruise, and no one on our ship, passenger's or crew got sick. Unfortunately, when they tried to resume operations recently, they did not fare as well....well covered in the news.
 

railiner

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Correct. That's why I didn't link it with cruise ships. It doesn't cruise. Basically, it's like the old fashioned transportation in the days before transatlantic air service. Mostly, it does straight port to/from port from one port in a country without intermediate stops in as short a reasonable time as it can. So, transatlantic US to UK is 7 days vs as much as twice that on cruise ships. You don't take Cunard for leisurely traveling and for on-board circuses.

So when Ferroequinologist corrected me by commenting that Cunard runs crossings, he is correct but I didn't consider them as a "cruise ship" because that's not how people think of cruise ships. In fact, we canceled a Cunard return of a European trip because, in our minds, it would have been no fun but just a bunch of old people showing how rich they are by dressing up at nightly formal dinners and going to elevator music concerts and boring lectures by unemployed college lecturers about the sites one actually sees when riding trains.

It actually would be a better counterpart to Amtrak than the cruise lines would be. Transportation with amenities rather than amenities with transport.
Actually, the Queen Mary 2 was conceived and built as a "hybrid" cross between an ocean liner and a cruise ship. Since she began operations, she has always split her annual schedule about half between "crossings" and cruises. In recent years, she has reduced the number of crossings somewhat in favor of more or longer cruises. One of the attributes that makes her an ocean liner, is her capability of doing the New York - Southampton run in just five days. But since those that just want speed will instead fly, she has lengthened her crossings to 7 or 8 days (with a Continent stop), since most doing the crossing want to enjoy the experience a bit longer. She also saves a huge amount of fuel by slowing down. She relies now on just her diesel powerplants, and only uses her thirsty gas turbines for emergency extra speed for storm evasion, or medical evacuation purposes.

As for Cunard's on board experience...I agree that it is by far the most 'formal' line at sea, today...but...that is exactly what most of Cunard's partisans are looking for...a very traditional maritime experience...and in that, nobody does it better....
 

noflyzone

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Correct. That's why I didn't link it with cruise ships. It doesn't cruise. Basically, it's like the old fashioned transportation in the days before transatlantic air service. Mostly, it does straight port to/from port from one port in a country without intermediate stops in as short a reasonable time as it can. So, transatlantic US to UK is 7 days vs as much as twice that on cruise ships. You don't take Cunard for leisurely traveling and for on-board circuses.

So when Ferroequinologist corrected me by commenting that Cunard runs crossings, he is correct but I didn't consider them as a "cruise ship" because that's not how people think of cruise ships. In fact, we canceled a Cunard return of a European trip because, in our minds, it would have been no fun but just a bunch of old people showing how rich they are by dressing up at nightly formal dinners and going to elevator music concerts and boring lectures by unemployed college lecturers about the sites one actually sees when riding trains.

It actually would be a better counterpart to Amtrak than the cruise lines would be. Transportation with amenities rather than amenities with transport.
\

I've been on a number of crossings on QM2 and take exception to your stereotypical comments about: ...a bunch of old people...,elevator music concerts...,and unemployed college lecturers. It sounds like you have never been on a Cunard ship but have assumed so much. Granted, there are no rock climbing walls, waterslides, racetracks, etc. for 'entertainment'. No drunks partying during spring break, no incessant rock music blasting away 24 hours a day,etc. I have seen a cross mix of people of all ages, no one flashing their wealth, and typically, lecturers such as a National Geographic explorer talking about his adventures. I find that fascinating.
So if it is not your cup of tea, I suggest you stick to a more 'fun' type of cruise. I won't criticize you and I won't make gross generalizations about your choices.
 

Barb Stout

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So when Ferroequinologist corrected me by commenting that Cunard runs crossings, he is correct but I didn't consider them as a "cruise ship" because that's not how people think of cruise ships. In fact, we canceled a Cunard return of a European trip because, in our minds, it would have been no fun but just a bunch of old people showing how rich they are by dressing up at nightly formal dinners and going to elevator music concerts and boring lectures by unemployed college lecturers about the sites one actually sees when riding trains.
 

Barb Stout

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Ever since the young Thunberg crossed the Atlantic on a ship (no, not a cruise ship, but whatever), I have thought either her way or a cruise ship might be fun. But I am prone to motion sickness on buses and as a passenger in cars, especially on curvey mountain roads and some of the very few times I was on a boat/ship on a large body of water. Would any cruises next to a shoreline be the same with regard to seasickness as crossing the ocean? How do they compare in that regard? I wouldn't want to try a cross-ocean ship trip without having a way to get back to land if any arising seasickness couldn't be dealt with properly.
 
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