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Difficulty getting into top bunk of a Roomette

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I don't like the bulkhead footholds plus how do you get your center of mass into the thing if you approach from the foot? I want a ladder. Stromberg Carlson makes a neat 6 lb. rv bunk ladder that is 60". So I need the distance from the edge of the top bunk to the floor, at maybe 10 degrees off the vertical. Can anybody give me that distance?
 

Palmetto

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I do not know the answer to your question, but it would seem imperative that your ladder is collapsible for ease of travel, no?
 

Lonestar648

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I am almost 70 and over weight, but I have never had a problem climbing into the upper bunk. I step up, sit on the edge, set the items I want in the holder, then crawl on to the bunk, roll on my back, prop my head up some for reading before going sleep. getting down in the night has not been an issue either since again I sit on the edge, put my feet on the step, turn and step down to the floor. Guess I have done it so much over the years, I really had to think about my process. These days since my grand-daughters travel with me holidays and summer, they beg for the upper, so I am always on the lower.
 

seat38a

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I don't like the bulkhead footholds plus how do you get your center of mass into the thing if you approach from the foot? I want a ladder. Stromberg Carlson makes a neat 6 lb. rv bunk ladder that is 60". So I need the distance from the edge of the top bunk to the floor, at maybe 10 degrees off the vertical. Can anybody give me that distance?
I've seen elderly gentlemen get in and out of the top bunk and he had was walking with a cane. If semi disabled seniors can get in and out, I think you'll be able to manage without bringing your own ladder. I've gotten in and out fine using the steps provided.
 

Devil's Advocate

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I've experienced little trouble getting into or out of the top bunk in a Superliner Roomette myself, but that doesn't change my view that it's a confusing and poorly designed mechanism.
 
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SP&S

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I'm 65 and, ahem, not skinny. Mrs SP&S tells me it's entertaining to see me get in to the top bunk but it's really no trouble. I don't see where you would find the room to set up, let alone store, a ladder in a roomette. Seriously, there's precious little floor space when both beds are in the nighttime configuration.
 
T

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Bowen, I was a gator navy greenside guy but that was 42 years ago! Thanks to all for your suggestions. FYI I went aboard the Texas Eagle today and measured the distance between the top of the upper berth support rail and the deck, and about a 10-15 degree angle and it was 55 1/2". The support rail is 2 1/8" wide so the hooks would need to engage that. Agree storage would be a slight nuisance as would be an injury from a fall, eh wot? Car builds probably vary, the one I looked at today had a wider first step than I remembered. Another thing I did not need to do in the Navy 42 years ago but need to now Is get up to use the head at least twice in each night... Another issue making me wish for a bedroom.
 
T

Texas and pacific fan

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Ok we are back from Chicago. I got into the bunk without the ladder I built, but using it was convenient when I tested it. The rungs worked out that one was on the exact same level as the top footrest and I could step right over on or off of it. The ladder stowed neatly in its factory box in the otherwise unused space behind the two steps. I did miss the bottom step one night coming down without it and put a dandy bruise on my left leg.

I cannot say enough how unpleasant the top bunk was on the rough tracks at night on the Eagle. As a rail fan I love a good grade crossing signal but sometimes it seemed the engineer was constantly blowing for crossings. To me it was as hard as plywood and even with the net I found myself bracing myself. I felt like a piece of Shake and bake chicken on a griddle. Next time we'll get a bedroom or two roomettes and I'll bring earplugs. I bet I only had 4 hours sleep.
 

Palmetto

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I don't usually sleep that well the first night out. Second night is much better. Of course if the trip is only one night, wellll................
 

Lonestar648

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When I haven't traveled for a while, first night was an adjustment, but when I was traveling nearly every week, I got so I never heard the train horn. Also, I had good way to lay that sorta braced me in the bed. As a side sleeper, one can not do this on the roomette since the beds are parallel to the length of the car, thus the side to side rock. In the bedrooms and the Family Room, the beds are the opposite direction so the rocking is head to foot instead of side to side. One will find it is easier to sleep in the Bedroom lower and upper.
 

GG-1

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When I haven't traveled for a while, first night was an adjustment, but when I was traveling nearly every week, I got so I never heard the train horn. Also, I had good way to lay that sorta braced me in the bed. As a side sleeper, one can not do this on the roomette since the beds are parallel to the length of the car, thus the side to side rock. In the bedrooms and the Family Room, the beds are the opposite direction so the rocking is head to foot instead of side to side. One will find it is easier to sleep in the Bedroom lower and upper.
Aloha

I am a side sleeper also, but found the opposite to be right for me. I much prefer the roomette and the side to side rock, much like I am sure may cradle was over a half century ago the the bedroom rock plus as the train started (in lower bunk) I rolled out of bed.
 

AmtrakBlue

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I'm a side sleeper and have never had trouble sleeping in a roomette...even in Kansas. I've never been in a bedroom except to visit my friends.
 

b243923

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If the roomette was free I would not take it. The upper bunk is like sleeping in a coffin. Your nose touches the ceiling and too bed is too narrow. I am not a large man and could not sleep on it. We folded the beds up and slept in the chair seating.
 

glomor

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I would like to know if there is a standard way for sleeping car attendants to make up a bed, regarding which end to locate the pillow. On all of my previous trips my feet were positioned in the direction of the engine. I assumed that must be standard procedure. However on my most recent trip, my head was in the "front" end. I slept just as well -- just curious...
 

AmtrakBlue

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I would like to know if there is a standard way for sleeping car attendants to make up a bed, regarding which end to locate the pillow. On all of my previous trips my feet were positioned in the direction of the engine. I assumed that must be standard procedure. However on my most recent trip, my head was in the "front" end. I slept just as well -- just curious...
I THINK it is feet towards the engine...so that if they go into emergency you feet, not your head, might hit the wall.
 

Devil's Advocate

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I would like to know if there is a standard way for sleeping car attendants to make up a bed, regarding which end to locate the pillow. On all of my previous trips my feet were positioned in the direction of the engine. I assumed that must be standard procedure. However on my most recent trip, my head was in the "front" end. I slept just as well -- just curious...
I THINK it is feet towards the engine...so that if they go into emergency you feet, not your head, might hit the wall.
I believe that is how the operations manual is written. However my personal experience is that I have had my bed made both ways.
 

jis

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I would like to know if there is a standard way for sleeping car attendants to make up a bed, regarding which end to locate the pillow. On all of my previous trips my feet were positioned in the direction of the engine. I assumed that must be standard procedure. However on my most recent trip, my head was in the "front" end. I slept just as well -- just curious...
I THINK it is feet towards the engine...so that if they go into emergency you feet, not your head, might hit the wall.
Not on Viewliners. On them it is feet towards the narrow end of the berth irrespective of where the engine is.
 

PVD

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On a viewliner roomette lower, very few people want their head next to the toilet. The previous poster says it "more politely"
 
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I would like to know if there is a standard way for sleeping car attendants to make up a bed, regarding which end to locate the pillow. On all of my previous trips my feet were positioned in the direction of the engine. I assumed that must be standard procedure. However on my most recent trip, my head was in the "front" end. I slept just as well -- just curious...
I THINK it is feet towards the engine...so that if they go into emergency you feet, not your head, might hit the wall.
Not on Viewliners. On them it is feet towards the narrow end of the berth irrespective of where the engine is.
If necessary, I remake the upper bunk with feet toward the steps, i.e., crawl-in, back-out, without removing the safety harness, I recognize the risk of crash or emergency stop but willing to risk that rather than a fall getting in or out.
 

Lonestar648

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my experience on four different trains recently was that all the SCA's made the beds with the head on the left without regard to the direction of the train. Five different SCA, pulled the mattress from above and made it the same. Also, the upper was always made with the head on the left.

separate note: three times the upper was made with the blanket, but never was the lower made with a blanket, which was provided on the bed in its plastic bag.
 
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