Dizzy, tired and rocking motion after a 4 day rail trek

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sodium

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Is this feeling normal after getting off a long train ride? I've been off the train for about 3 hours now and I still feel like I'm rocking back and forth.
 

AmtrakBlue

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Could be. Similar to cruises. I've never taken a cruise, but do remember my mom saying she watched the house across the street "sail" down the street from her kitchen window a day or two after she got back from a cruise. :giggle:

I slept on our cabin cruiser when I was a kid and the next day at church I was still rocking back and forth.
 

Ryan

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Yep. Your body gets used to compensating for the motion and gets confused when it goes away.

Happened to me all the time on the ship, it'll pass shortly.
 

HenryK

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Many of us have thrumming sensations in our legs for two or three days after a train trip. It's a neurological condition that isn't very serious but can get more intense the older one gets.
 

tim49424

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My first half dozen trips, after getting home I was hearing train horns in my head all the time and I lived in a community where there was a "no blow zone" ordinance.

Also after LD trips to the west coast, I've experienced the equivalent to jet lag so yes I was tired but never dizzy or felt a rocking motion after a trip.
 
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Cina

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Yeah, I get that after a couple days on the train. It's always amazing how solid the earth is to me after so long in a wobbling can on wheels. Not sure it takes three hours to get over it for me, maybe an hour or two.
 

FormerOBS

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It probably has a lot of names. We always called it "train feet". It'll go away after a while. Various duration for different people. When it's your job, it eventually goes away or becomes unnoticeable. When I had been working for Amtrak over 15 years, I took several months off for neck surgery and a hip replacement. After my first trip following the extended leave, I had train feet for the first time in years. But I never had the condition again.

Tom
 

sodium

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Thanks for the replies, I thought I was getting sick but it seems like its the norm. I'm glad I took my train trip home from NY to SF instead of first. But I actually think I might be coming down with something. I heard a lot of people coughing on board and one lady seated next to me during a lunch stated she upgraded to a sleeping unit because she came down with something and wasn't feeling too well :(

I feel bad for an old timer couple who I was seated with during a meal. They did the exact same trip as I but they were coming to SF as the start of their trip to visit some family. I know they are going to be feeling the effects if I did. I'm half their age.
 

FrensicPic

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I spent three years on a destroyer...motion sickness not a problem both during and after.

I have noticed after a couple of ocean fishing trips that I'd experience that phenomena only while in the shower after getting back home. The running water was triggering it!

I remember, as a kid, after roller skating for a long time, after taking the skates off, it felt like I was still on skates.
 

Triley

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It probably has a lot of names. We always called it "train feet". It'll go away after a while. Various duration for different people. When it's your job, it eventually goes away or becomes unnoticeable. When I had been working for Amtrak over 15 years, I took several months off for neck surgery and a hip replacement. After my first trip following the extended leave, I had train feet for the first time in years. But I never had the condition again.

Tom
You didn't have to experience it, but working the Acelas are horrible. Our Boston based ones are seventeen hour days including the report time and roughly two hour layover, so it may be more noticeable for us. But when I first started, after a trip, I'd be laying in bed and swear the bed was swaying.
 

Alexandria Nick

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I get something like that after I fly. I'll have this feeling of...surging. Like I'm moving forward quickly, then slowing down, then speeding up again. It usually goes away after I sleep.

Oddly, I also had it happen after I experienced my first earthquake. For a week or so, I'd get this feeling that I'd liken to what riding the subway feels like, because that's what the earthquake felt like. It would startle me, then go away. Except one time it was an aftershock.
 

west point

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Another result is when viewing out the rear of a train after stopping the eyes still think you are going backwards.
 

NW cannonball

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Something like what they used to call "sea legs" that sailors would get. When they'd get ashore they'd have trouble walking on flat steady land, and would look kinda drunk to casual observers, possibly leading to the mostly false idea that sailors on shore are mostly drunk (it aint so)

Me, never had problems with adjusting from or to planes, trains, buses, nor small boats (nor with motion sickness) -- I've been lucky that way.

Unlike my sailor daughter though, I can't and won't ride those "midway attractions" that spin you three ways at once a hundred feet in the air.

There's so much individual variation on how people react to motion -- from fighter pilots that seem to like turning 3-D fast turns in the air -- to people who get uncomfortable with a short ride on the light rail.

One of my memories from pre-Amtrak days, I was maybe 8 years old -- "How can that conductor walk down the aisle and never fall over and never grab anything?"

YMMV
 

AmtrakBlue

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I've never felt sick from riding trains or planes. I probably have had some motion sensations after getting off the train, but not enough, or long enough, to remember.

I, too, remember how I'd feel like I was still wearing my roller skates after taking them off. Same thing (feeling taller than I am) after getting off a horse.

As others have said, we're all different and experience things differently.

My only "problem" on the trains is a dry bloody nose so I now take saline solution with me on trips.
 

PRR 60

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From Wikipedia:

Sea legs, dock rock, or stillness illness

After being on a small boat for a few hours and then going back onto land, it may feel like there is still rising and falling, as if one is still on the boat. It can also occur on other situations, such as after a long train journey. It is not clear whether sea legs is a form of aftereffect to the predominant frequency of the stimulation (e.g., the waves or the rocking of the train), whether it is a form of learning to adjust one's gait and posture, or whether it is a form of the Tetris effect.
 
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Phil S

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Never got it from trains but definitely from boats, actually ships. Small boats mostly bounce and lurch, ships mostly wallow. As for ill effects of any sort, never from trains. Occasional sea sickness. Never air sickness. That said, I come down with what we call "kennel cough" about 1/2 the time I fly -- as for dogs, being cooped up in a small space with many other people and a completely inadequate air supply, respiratory disease runs rampant. One of many reasons I prefer trains (or ships, but not buses) to flying. .
 

neroden

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Some people get motion sickness from trains. I don't, even though I get it on ships and in cars and buses and planes. I suspect it's because trains have strictly *rolling* motions, and I'm only bothered by yaw and pitch.
 

me_little_me

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I get off at every "smoke stop" not to smoke but just to walk around near my car - that means every 3-4 hours. I never have a problem.
 

Thirdrail7

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Sometimes, I still feel like I'm on the train when I'm at home. It takes time to adjust.
 

Chey

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I usually have that swaying/rocking sensation for a day or so after a LD train trip. It's especially noticeable when I lay down to sleep. I've always kind of liked it, it actually helps me sleep.
 
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