Empire Builder accident (9/25/21)

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west point

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The American airlines accident cause was fairly straight forward. The maintenance director ordered hanger maintenance to use a fork lift instead of a non working engine lift. Non precision of forklift damaged the engine mounts. Engine snagged control cables that retracted leading edge devices on that side. Crew almost saved airplane just needed a couple more knots airspeed. Manager then AKA as " fork lift JOE "


The cause of that accident allowed an Air Florida captain with knowledge to abort a take off at MIA that had same problem even though airplane was well above lift off speed that saved the AF airplane. Fortunately took off on the very long extended runway. That runway extension caused FEC to build a horse shoe to the west to allow for the extension.
 

WWW

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After the inspection and related stuff - where do the wrecked cars go to be repaired or have a future in beverage cans ?
Is that what is done at the Beech Grove facility at Indianapolis ? Or somewhere else on the West Coast ?
 

Just-Thinking-51

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Superliner are maintained at Beech Grove. Beech Grove does heavy maintenance, and wrecked repairs.

However the three cars that roll on there side, and then we’re roll over the roof, onto there other side may not be worth the effort to get them to Beech Grove.

The railcars that were upright need to be inspected. The normal policy after a derailment is replace any wheels that hit the ground. The repairs may not be done at Beech Grove unless there other damage or if they are unsure ride quality of the railcars trucks.
 

Rasputin

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Link to an article in the Flathead Beacon (Apologies if this has been posted before):

 

Cal

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Link to an article in the Flathead Beacon (Apologies if this has been posted before):

It has not been posted before.

"and the bathroom door, the lock failed for whatever reason, and it flew open.”

Would just like to say that it might not have actually been locked. I have experienced a situation where the bathroom door was not actually locked, but believed to be locked because it was difficult to slide the handle past the point it was already at. This led to an embarrassing situation. Perhaps it was a similar situation.
 

FrensicPic

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It has not been posted before.

"and the bathroom door, the lock failed for whatever reason, and it flew open.”

Would just like to say that it might not have actually been locked. I have experienced a situation where the bathroom door was not actually locked, but believed to be locked because it was difficult to slide the handle past the point it was already at. This led to an embarrassing situation. Perhaps it was a similar situation.
I think we've all had that "oops" happen with the latch on the door!
 

Rasputin

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"and the bathroom door, the lock failed for whatever reason, and it flew open.”

Would just like to say that it might not have actually been locked. I have experienced a situation where the bathroom door was not actually locked, but believed to be locked because it was difficult to slide the handle past the point it was already at. This led to an embarrassing situation. Perhaps it was a similar situation.
If I recall correctly (and corrections would be welcome) I think there is a minor difference between the bathroom locks in a Superliner sleeping car and a Superliner coach. In the sleeping car restrooms, there is a light which comes on when the lock is correctly engaged. In the coaches, there is a similar sliding lock in the restrooms but I don't seem to recall that there is a light which comes on to indicate when the lock is correctly engaged.

Still, when a car is violently thrust on its side, it would not surprise me to discover that the locking mechanism could be disengaged by the impact and the door flung open.
 

Willbridge

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If I recall correctly (and corrections would be welcome) I think there is a minor difference between the bathroom locks in a Superliner sleeping car and a Superliner coach. In the sleeping car restrooms, there is a light which comes on when the lock is correctly engaged. In the coaches, there is a similar sliding lock in the restrooms but I don't seem to recall that there is a light which comes on to indicate when the lock is correctly engaged.

Still, when a car is violently thrust on its side, it would not surprise me to discover that the locking mechanism could be disengaged by the impact and the door flung open.
Having lots of experience in Superliner coaches I can explain why one wouldn't recall the "occupied" locked-door indicator. They are really tiny and often are bad-order. SO, you lock the door and the next user comes along and pounds on the door trying to get it to open. Over the years, that results in doors getting out of alignment, making it difficult or impossible to latch the door correctly.

Civilized trains like the Talgos let you know whether rest rooms are occupied or not before you might try to open the door.
 

me_little_me

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Civilized trains like the Talgos let you know whether rest rooms are occupied or not before you might try to open the door.
So do Viewliners and, I believe, superliners. There is a light near the ceiling by the doors for each restroom in coach when the room is locked.
 
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