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UserNameRequired

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Halpin-CP 175039160.695BNSF
CP 1750-Galesburg51160.875BNSF

So, between Halpin (Albia, IA) and Galesburg IL we have "CP 1750". How does one figure out where/what CP 1750 is?
 
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Halpin-CP 175039160.695BNSF
CP 1750-Galesburg51160.875BNSF

So, between Halpin (Albia, IA) and Galesburg IL we have "CP 1750". How does one figure out where/what CP 1750 is?
What route is this?
The "1750" is likely the mile post (location). CP is "control point", typically a switch at a siding, junction, etc.
First, as you travel keep an eye out for mile post (MP) markers and signal placards (the signal number is actually the MP). The fourth digit is the decimal mile so, a MP of 175.0 would be displayed as 1750 (no decimal)
Second, listening to the scanner to catch the engineer radioing the conductor to change channels. In your example above that would be either 39 or 51 depending on direction of travel. It is easy to miss those transmissions!
 

zephyr17

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Halpin-CP 175039160.695BNSF
CP 1750-Galesburg51160.875BNSF

So, between Halpin (Albia, IA) and Galesburg IL we have "CP 1750". How does one figure out where/what CP 1750 is?
General Answer :CP 1750 means Control Point 1750. The 1750 almost certain refers to a milepost location, which is probably at or near MP 1750 or MP 175.0. Get your hands on an employee timetable and/or scout the subdivision.

Specific answer:
You got that off OTOL for the CZ. In this case, CP 1750 translates to MP 175.0. The road channel goes from channel 51 for the Galesburg terminal area, which is quite busy, and the distance on that channel is quite short. MP 175.0 is not far west of Galesburg, probably just past Cameron where the Junction with the former AT&SF mainline is and where the SW Chief peels off the former Burlington.

Scan both channels after leaving Galesburg westbound, and about 20 minutes or so before Galesburg eastbound. Or listen for "Roll to 39/roll to 51" from the crew.

Remember the OTOL frequencies are crowdsourced from scanner enthusiasts and are not always up to date based on who is riding and reporting. It is a good reference but not a perfect one, so be prepared to do a broad AAR channel scan to relocate the road channel if you lose it.
 
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UserNameRequired

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Thanks! That helps, yes CZ.

Is there a phraseology standard manual for engineer/conductor? (like in the air we have the manuals Pilot/Controller Glossary, AIM Chap 4 Sec 2, JO 7110.65Z ATC)
 
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Thanks! That helps, yes CZ.

Is there a phraseology standard manual for engineer/conductor? (like in the air we have the manuals Pilot/Controller Glossary, AIM Chap 4 Sec 2, JO 7110.65Z ATC)
Not specifically communications but, the closest might be the General Code of Operating Rules (GCOR). It covers pretty much everthing related to operating trains including a section on "Railroad Radio and Communications Rules".

You pretty much just have to become familiar with the lingo!
 
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zephyr17

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Thanks! That helps, yes CZ.

Is there a phraseology standard manual for engineer/conductor? (like in the air we have the manuals Pilot/Controller Glossary, AIM Chap 4 Sec 2, JO 7110.65Z ATC)
Not generally. There are a few, like I understand use of the word "Stop" is now mandated, the traditional "That'll do" is now insufficient by itself and a rules violation. "That'll do. Stop" is more commonly heard than a simple "Stop" in my experience, though.

"Roll to" the new channel is fairly common. "Go to" is, too. Just "Roll channel" without mentioning channel number is not unknown. They know what it ought to be. On the other end just the channel number is heard, too.

Shortest exchange:
Engineer: "22"
Conductor: (click)

Colorful exchange:
Engineer: "Roll Deuces"
Conductor: "Rolling Deuces"

I don't know if use of the traditional "Highball" is mandated, but it is certainly used almost universally.

On leaving Salem:
Conductor: "Highball Salem on signal indication!"
Engineer: "Highball!"
 
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Not generally. There are a few, like I understand use of the word "Stop" is now mandated, the traditional "That'll do" is now insufficient by itself and a rules violation. "That'll do. Stop" is more commonly heard than a simple "Stop" in my experience, though.

"Roll to" the new channel is fairly common. "Go to" is, too. Just "Roll channel" without mentioning channel number is not unknown. They know what it ought to be. On the other end just the channel number is heard, too.

Shortest exchange:
Engineer: "22"
Conductor: (click)

Colorful exchange:
Engineer: "Roll Deuces"
Conductor: "Rolling Deuces"

I don't know if use of the traditional "Highball" is mandated, but it is certainly used almost universally.

On leaving Salem:
Conductor: "Highball Salem on signal indication!"
Engineer: "Highball!"
Even simpler, "Lets roll"!
 

railiner

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I always liked: "Highball the dragger, Number Six"...conductor acknowledging to engineer that there were no defects reported by trackside automatic dragging equipment detector.
 
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When in a "restricting" (flashing red) situation, the train must remain at restricted speed until the next favorable signal - the train's leading wheels must reach the signal so, you will hear the term "leading wheels" over the air.
The more casual comment when calling the next signal while at restricted speed is, "Signal 2345, clear - when we get there!".
 
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zephyr17

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When in a "restricting" (flashing red) situation
A hard red is also a "restricting" indication on an intermediate/non absolute signal (one with a number plate on the mast) or an absolute with a "G" (for grade) plate. A hard red aspect is only a "stop" indication on an absolute signal without a "G" plate.

The differences between the meaning of what a seems to be simple, a hard red signal light, is a good illustration of the importance of the difference between signal "aspect" and "indication" 😉.
 
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