Small plane discussion

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anumberone

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Sort of funny how the bug bites some and stays for life, but some folks turn blasé. I have a friend who flew F-9s in a ground support role in Korea, but never flew again after the war...
Yeah, I don’t know. A guy I used to scuba dive with was an instructor in B17 bombers during the war and also never flew again.
 

Bob Dylan

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There was a "TTA" Trans-Texas Airways years ago. One of their DC-3's (N18121) still flies today at 83 years old. She flew from Albany, OR to France for the D-Day Memorial a couple of years. I've had the honor of being a flight attendant on her back in the 70's.View attachment 18291
I flew in many a DC-3/ C-47 Gooney Bird as a Passenger and Co-Pilot, but never as Pilot in Command.( I dont have a Multi-Engine Rating).

EZ to Fly, the workhorse of WW-II and the Airlines after the War.

Probably, along with the 737, the Longest Lasting Commercial Aircraft well ever see.
 

anumberone

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I flew in many a DC-3/ C-47 Gooney Bird as a Passenger and Co-Pilot, but never as Pilot in Command.( I dont have a Multi-Engine Rating).

EZ to Fly, the workhorse of WW-II and the Airlines after the War.

Probably, along with the 737, the Longest Lasting Commercial Aircraft well ever see.
737, maybe. 747, was around 10 years before the 737. Also a lot better looking.
But, A DC3 is something to see and hope they can keep flying
 

PVD

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actually, the maiden flight of the 737 was before the 747, but it (747) sure was better looking, especially back then. The 737-100 (not very many built), and the 200 were not very attractive, with the skinny looking JT8s under the wing looking like they didn't belong...
 

Willbridge

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Yeah, I don’t know. A guy I used to scuba dive with was an instructor in B17 bombers during the war and also never flew again.
In 1975 I was on the Salem>Portland Commuter Club bus and commented to my seatmate that the thunderheads that were building up over the farms looked beautiful. He was a quiet rider, who had been making the commute since before I-5 was built. He worked for Childrens Services and did not talk about his job. But, he eyed the clouds and told me, in a modest tone, "about" how high they were. Knowing what career field he was in, I had to ask him how he knew that. It turned out that he was a veteran of flying DC-3's over the Hump.
 

Bob Dylan

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My First Flight Instructor flew B-29s during WWII ( as Did my Dad), but he would never talk about it. Best pilot I ever saw or flew with, he was a Master with a plane!

I found out that he was the Co-Pilot on the B-29 that dropped the 2nd Atomic Bomb on Nagasaki, so I understood why he didnt want to to dwell on it.( neither would my dad who flew Fire Bomb Missions over Japan from Tinian/ His Squadron Dropped the 1st Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima)
 

anumberone

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My First Flight Instructor flew B-29s during WWII ( as Did my Dad), but he would never talk about it. Best pilot I ever saw or flew with, he was a Master with a plane!

I found out that he was the Co-Pilot on the B-29 that dropped the 2nd Atomic Bomb on Nagasaki, so I understood why he didnt want to to dwell on it.( neither would my dad who flew Fire Bomb Missions over Japan from Tinian/ His Squadron Dropped the 1st Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima)
Damn Jim, I'm thoroughly impressed..I have went thru- The B29 that dropped the bomb on Nagasaki, maybe you have also. It's at the museum in Dayton Ohio. It's slightly cut away for access to walk through. Ironically it's name is Bockscar.
 
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Bob Dylan

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I have went thru- The B29 that dropped the bomb on Nagasaki, maybe you have also. It's at the museum in Dayton Ohio. It's slightly cut away for access to walk through. Ironically it's name is Bockscar.
Only have seen pics, I haven't been there!
 

PVD

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Enola Gay is at the Udvar-Hazy branch of the Air and Space out by Dulles. Interestingly that group of B-29s were built by Glen Martin rather than Boeing, at that time anyone who could build something, did. Forgot whether Ford built 17's or 24's to pitch in.
 

anumberone

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Enola Gay is at the Udvar-Hazy branch of the Air and Space out by Dulles. Interestingly that group of B-29s were built by Glen Martin rather than Boeing, at that time anyone who could build something, did. Forgot whether Ford built 17's or 24's to pitch in.
It's amazing how they was able to crank up that whole war machine and how quick they evolved to match the requirements.
 

Bob Dylan

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Enola Gay is at the Udvar-Hazy branch of the Air and Space out by Dulles. Interestingly that group of B-29s were built by Glen Martin rather than Boeing, at that time anyone who could build something, did. Forgot whether Ford built 17's or 24's to pitch in.
I've seen the Enola Gay,(love the Air and Space😍 )and Several other B-29s, even got a ride in the last one flying that belongs to the old Confederate Air Force, now the Commenrative Air Force.
 

gswager

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Fascinating stories! I've flew on DC-3 plane during the municipal airport air show. It was my first ride with tail wheel which is very fascinating. You can't see the runway ahead from the cockpit.

I've flown in 6 seat Cessna, sail plane twice, and small commercial props outside of TSA area.
 

PVD

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Used to see them here occasionally, both Air New England and PBA had them in short haul service.
 

railiner

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Had my one flight aboard PBA's N136PB , at the time, the highest airtime commercial aircraft. Took Amtrak's Cape Codder from New York to Hyannis, and then flew from there to Logan. It was crammed with 28, instead of the designed 21 seats. I pointed out oil leaking from the engine nacelle to the flight attendant. She said she would tell the Captain. She came back, and told me the Captain said not to worry, it's normal. Said to only worry if it stops leaking oil...😄

 

railiner

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That the DC-3 was 'over-engineered' is ably demonstrated by the fact that they were able to add 33% more seating to it, without any major modifications that I am aware of....how many of today's modern regional aircraft of similar size could duplicate that feat? Not any, I suspect....
 

Bob Dylan

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That the DC-3 was 'over-engineered' is ably demonstrated by the fact that they were able to add 33% more seating to it, without any major modifications that I am aware of....how many of today's modern regional aircraft of similar size could duplicate that feat? Not any, I suspect....
As a kid I heard many a story from my dads C-47 Pilot friends from WWII and Korea.

It was amazing how you could overload these workhorses and long as the engines were working and the wings were still on, they'd keep on flying!

I was flying as Co-pilot on a Joy ride on a DC-3 that was older than me, and both engines quit, yet it glided just like a bird into a soft landing in a Corn field. 😍
 

PVD

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Much easier to keep a non pressurized plane going as they age....
 

MARC Rider

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Used to see them here occasionally, both Air New England and PBA had them in short haul service.
Ah, Air New England. Back when I was in college, my girlfriend wanted to fly up to Maine to spend some time at the cabin with me and my family. She booked a ticked from New York to Auburn/Lewiston, which we thought was the closest airport to us. When we arrived to pick her up, we found the airport was closed because they were digging up the runway. I think there were instructions to drive over to PWM (Portland) and find your passengers there. So that's what we did. Well, the whole place was a mess, and people were wondering where the passengers were. Finally, someone at the airline managed to determine that mt girlfriend was stuck at Logan and couldn't figure out which flight to take. In the end, the put her on a flight to Augusta, so we had to drive up there. The plane finally came in, it was a DC-3. My girlfriend sort of staggered off, looking a little green around the gills.

We still couldn't figure out how Air New England managed to sell tickets to a closed airport. We also found out that the drive back to the cabin from Augusta was shorter than that from Auburn/Lewiston, so for a wile, when people flew up, they flew to Augusta. Now we don't bother with the commuter airlines, we either just fly to PWM or fly to Logan and and take the Concord Coach up to Augusta. I like to take the Acela and rent a car in Boston.
 

Palmland

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As a big treat, my grandmother took me on my first airplane ride from Clarksville, TN to Nashville - around 50 miles - to visit relatives. It was a big deal for a kid and I remember being impressed with the sloping aisle in the plane and amazed at the view of the treetops. This was on Ozark airlines in the 50's. In 2009 we were driving to my son's wedding in Key West and I about ran off the road when I spotted this at the Marathon airport. A detour and photos through the fence were required!

My wife's dad was a bomber pilot in WWII and flew them all. We still have the bullet from the cockpit he dug out in flying over the South Pacific. Our favorite photo is of him and his crew in Sloppy Joe's c.1942. All were in full uniform and were based in Havana for training exercises. They had no idea what the nest few years would bring.


DSC_0051.jpg
 

anumberone

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As a kid I heard many a story from my dads C-47 Pilot friends from WWII and Korea.

It was amazing how you could overload these workhorses and long as the engines were working and the wings were still on, they'd keep on flying!

I was flying as Co-pilot on a Joy ride on a DC-3 that was older than me, and both engines quit, yet it glided just like a bird into a soft landing in a Corn field. 😍
Wow, that had to be an experience. Gotta watch those fuel Gage's
 

anumberone

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When I worked at United Airlines they still had a few DC3. It is weird looking up at the angle from the door to the front seat.

Forward visibility in a tail dragger type aircraft is zilch while taxiing. I was looking in the cockpit of the replica of The Spirit Of St. Louis that Charles Lindbergh flew across the Atlantic to Paris. Their was no forward visibility at all at any time. All you could see forward was a very limited panel with a steel rod that was bent at 90° protruding out of the center of the panel. Had to do with fuel tank selection. If I remember their was a fuel tank right in front of him.Talmantz Aviation built the plane from scratch and Frank Talman Landed it at the big Paris Airshow recreating Lindbergh landing there after his historic flight. It was also used in the movie.
 

Willbridge

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During the 1966 airline pilots' strike, Dow Jones chartered two DC-3's from Carolina Aircraft Corp. (may not have the name exactly right). They flew the Wall Street Journal and Barron's which were printed in Palo Alto. One flight ran SFO>PDX>SEA>SFO and the other flew SFO>RNO>SLC>SFO. They took turns on each route. My dad, who was the DJ wholesaler in Oregon loved their reliability; they flew through all kinds of weather, weather that would have caused United to cancel or overfly us in Portland. We customers provided the ground crew.

He also recollects the outfit as being straight out of "Terry and the Pirates" - a comic strip and radio serial that a couple of people here may recall. The co-pilot wore a scarf and had a little black book with lots of women's phone numbers. The company's previous job was flying parts and supplies for a tin mine in Peru.
 

anumberone

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During the 1966 airline pilots' strike, Dow Jones chartered two DC-3's from Carolina Aircraft Corp. (may not have the name exactly right). They flew the Wall Street Journal and Barron's which were printed in Palo Alto. One flight ran SFO>PDX>SEA>SFO and the other flew SFO>RNO>SLC>SFO. They took turns on each route. My dad, who was the DJ wholesaler in Oregon loved their reliability; they flew through all kinds of weather, weather that would have caused United to cancel or overfly us in Portland. We customers provided the ground crew.

He also recollects the outfit as being straight out of "Terry and the Pirates" - a comic strip and radio serial that a couple of people here may recall. The co-pilot wore a scarf and had a little black book with lots of women's phone numbers. The company's previous job was flying parts and supplies for a tin mine in Peru.
Challenging the weather along with Wild and crazy times.
 
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