Stadler, let testing begin on Caltrain kiss .

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caravanman

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Funny to see a train mounted on flat cars, one would imagine it could be better just towed on it's own wheels? Maybe the couplings are not compatible with existing loco couplings? Maybe being "brand new" they come with no miles on the clock, hard to imagine they had no test miles run when at the construction site...
 

jiml

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Funny to see a train mounted on flat cars, one would imagine it could be better just towed on it's own wheels? Maybe the couplings are not compatible with existing loco couplings? Maybe being "brand new" they come with no miles on the clock, hard to imagine they had no test miles run when at the construction site...
That's an interesting observation - one I had also wondered about. Being a frequent railcam viewer I have seen equipment moves done both ways. It's not unusual to see new rail vehicles of all descriptions on flatcars for delivery or towed on their own wheels. I haven't noticed an obvious preference. The new Acela of course, was towed all the way across the country to Pueblo.
 

John Santos

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It might depend on whether the wheels, trucks or mechanical structure are a new design without much history. They don't want a bearing to give out or a casting to crack or a coupler to fail in the middle of nowhere. It would be hard to tow to a repair facility and they would probably have to send out a crane and flatcar to move it. Meanwhile a single-track mainline could be blocked for days.

I think usually even cars that are intended for permanent coupling have adapters (or maybe a specialized adapter short car or a modified switcher) so they can be moved around maintenance and storage yards using conventional switching engines. But those might not be certified for long-distance or higher speed travel.

Once they've passed their initial acceptance testing, I think they would probably deliver them on their own wheels. If possible, it would usually be cheaper since they wouldn't have to rent or buy flatcars for the purpose and pay the expense of loading and unloading them from the flatcars. On the other hand, I think standard gauge subway and LRV cars are often delivered on flatcars.

Disclaimer: I am not a railroad engineer (of either the civil, mechanical or locomotive variety), I just like trains.
 

Eric S

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I was curious what KISS means, so I Iooked it up. Wikipedia says it's "Komfortabler Innovativer Spurtstarker S-Bahn-Zug", meaning "comfortable, innovative, sprint-capable suburban train" -- not "Keep It Simple, Stupid".
Stadler is definitely a fan of cute acronyms for its products. In addition to the KISS, there is also the FLIRT and WINK.
 

GiantsFan

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Any updates on the whereabouts of the sets being shipped out? Would love to see some pics of them on the move or some test footage!
 

cirdan

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Once they've passed their initial acceptance testing, I think they would probably deliver them on their own wheels. If possible, it would usually be cheaper since they wouldn't have to rent or buy flatcars for the purpose and pay the expense of loading and unloading them from the flatcars. On the other hand, I think standard gauge subway and LRV cars are often delivered on flatcars.
In some cases this may be because even if the track gauge is the same, there may be minor differences in wheel profile etc that might lead to derailment on switches.

It may also have to do with brakes. The brakes may not yet be working at the time of the transfer, or maybe even if they are, they may not be compatible to standard railroad brakes and there may not even be a thru pipe so you end up with a consist that cannot be braked properly. A failure of the coupling might have catastrophic results.
 

sitzplatz17

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Funny to see a train mounted on flat cars, one would imagine it could be better just towed on it's own wheels? Maybe the couplings are not compatible with existing loco couplings? Maybe being "brand new" they come with no miles on the clock, hard to imagine they had no test miles run when at the construction site...
i think what’s different or interesting about this delivery is that, unlike the Acela II or new Siemens Venture coaches, these were being hauled as part of a larger manifest train. That might be part of the reason they’re on flat cars instead of being rolled on the track?
 

west point

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If I was paying for new cars or even antique cars I would want them on flat cars. Not being pulled by a freight loco. Now passenger cars Amtrak certified ferried by Amtrak maybe a different kettle of fish as long as not too many miles off Amtrak.
 

Trogdor

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Those are... not attractive...
They will look better when in a proper solid consist with their cab cars.

I do not understand why they have doors on two different levels though. The platforms are all the same height.
 

TrackWalker

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EMU Brochure

"The six-car EMU shown in the brochure features dual boarding height doors throughout, to share platforms with high-speed rail and to enable Caltrain to transition gradually to gap-free level boarding, to cut down dwell times for the blended system.

As delivered, the upper level boarding doors are sealed and 5 seats are configured longitudinally in each vestibule on the intermediate level, accounting for 10 seats per car..."
 

jrud

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Feb 12, 2018
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Another very brief, but nice, video of testing.

 
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