tipping? meals?

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Bob Dylan

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***? What alternate Universe do y'all live in if you think $1 coins and $2 Bills are worthless?

Last time I checked they were US Currency and spend just fine! Lots of our members tip with them on LD Train trips and I've never seen an Amtrak OBS turn them down!!!

Anyone that doesn't want them can send them to me!
 

Hal

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Jun 5, 2015
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I bought 50 two dollar bills just for dining tips. I usually left two or three per meal. Depending on the service.
My kid is now in the restaurant business, and I can tell you that leaving something really odd like a $2 bill is definitely not appreciated. The reality is they can't do anything with such, and because of it, the $2 bill will just get tossed into a drawer or box.
Leaving a $2 bill, or a $1 coin, is worse than leaving no tip at all, and writing "FU" on the check. You'll be badly remembered by the table help, if you should ever dare to return.

In other words, if you think you're being cute or cleaver with a $2 bill, you're not.
A $2 bill are cash. If he can't use it somewhere because someone refuses it, then take it to the bank and get 2 ones. Same with the $1 coins.
I could be a problem for some. There are some who think it is cute to tip with a $2 bill on cruises and those workers do have problems using those bills. Those workers don't have access to a bank in general and have had issues with those bills. No problem on Amtrak though. The crew can simply exchange the $2 bills or $1 coins for dollar bills from their cash receipts or exchange them where they remit. The remittance office will accept them. LSA's are actually issued the $1 coins in their bank to give as change. Congress having nothing better to do required they have $1 coins to give as change.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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FormerOBS

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It's all money, and it's all appreciated. Two dollar bills and dollar coins are not liked by all retailers, but they will generally accept them. Amtrak remittance offices will accept those odd denominations from LSA's in the course of processing their cash receipts, but they aren't very willing to deal with making change for those who aren't LSA's.

Many years ago, we had a regular customer who left telephone cards as tips. He would ask how many people were working on the car (including kitchen crew) and leave enough cards for all. This became irrelevant as cell phones gained in popularity.

The one thing that is really not appreciated is foreign money. Banks near the border are more likely to accept that, but my own bank, which is nowhere near the border, does not. Some places charge a fee for exchanging it, which ultimately reduces its value to the employee. I still have a good deal of foreign money that I received as tips over the years, but now I'm not even sure where I put it. Some day maybe I'll get to Canada (or close) and exchange it.

If your goal is to do something nice to show appreciation, why not make it simple and easy? After all, most of us didn't take the job because we are numismatists.

Tom
 
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jis

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Besides if you are holding Francs or Deutsche Marks you will have to find a central bank in Europe to trade them in for Euros :(
 

andersone

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I can bet cash that if the topic is tipping it always dissolves into this two dollar morass. Some never listened to Mother about telling the same story a thousand times. What a one trick pony
 

greatcats

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When I was a tour bus driver several years ago in Arizona in Alaska, I was tipped at least once in Euros and once with a bill from Singapore. No problem- cried all the way to the bank.
 

zephyr17

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Money is money. If it is US legal tender and the tip is given within the US, who cares what it looks like?
 
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neroden

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I bought 50 two dollar bills just for dining tips. I usually left two or three per meal. Depending on the service.
My kid is now in the restaurant business, and I can tell you that leaving something really odd like a $2 bill is definitely not appreciated. The reality is they can't do anything with such, and because of it, the $2 bill will just get tossed into a drawer or box.

Leaving a $2 bill, or a $1 coin, is worse than leaving no tip at all, and writing "FU" on the check. You'll be badly remembered by the table help, if you should ever dare to return.

In other words, if you think you're being cute or cleaver with a $2 bill, you're not.
Seriously, you and your kid don't know how to spend cash? Seriously? If your kid doesn't like money, he should get the hell out of the restaurant business and go, I don't know, join a commune or something.

$2 bills and $1 coins are both legal tender in the US. In fact, if this country had any sense, $1 bills would have been abolished 40 years ago, so I do my part for advocacy by avoiding them. Every waiter I've ever dealt with has been perfectly appreciative of money, and if they aren't, well, they don't have to take money, I can certainly spend it on people who aren't ungrateful twits like (according to you) your kid!
 
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Radvlad

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Have to agree with EVERYONE. A $2 dollar bill is U.S. currency. Anyone who doesn't accept it is actually breaking the law.
 

niemi24s

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And I've got to agree with Andersone:

I can bet cash that if the topic is tipping it always dissolves into this two dollar morass. Some never listened to Mother about telling the same story a thousand times. What a one trick pony
When the $2 bill blather starts pouring in I start to wonder what became of my Clinton (Slick Willie) $3 bill!
 
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Trainmans daughter

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As someone who has been known to generously give out $2 bills as tips, here are a couple of thoughts on the subject:

*A bunch of $2.00 bills in my wallet take up half the amount of space as the same value of a bunch of $1.00 bills. Great when traveling.

*One $2.00 bill = two $1.00 bills. Really!

Besides, they are kind of a novelty and fun to give out. I was really shocked to think that some people equate my $2.00 bills with writing FU on the check. (And you have no idea how long it took me to be able to write that. It is so offensive).
 

GG-1

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***? What alternate Universe do y'all live in if you think $1 coins and $2 Bills are worthless?

Last time I checked they were US Currency and spend just fine! Lots of our members tip with them on LD Train trips and I've never seen an Amtrak OBS turn them down!!!

Anyone that doesn't want them can send them to me!
You beat me to it, I will take any coin you don't want.

Aloha
 

Devil's Advocate

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And I've got to agree with Andersone:

I can bet cash that if the topic is tipping it always dissolves into this two dollar morass. Some never listened to Mother about telling the same story a thousand times. What a one trick pony
I don't really understand AU's bizarre fascination with $2 bills myself, but the idea that somebody's kid actually takes offense at being tipped in the "wrong" denominations of the correct currency took precedence over everything else.

When the $2 bill blather starts pouring in I start to wonder what became of my Clinton (Slick Willie) $3 bill!
Hilarious. I can't wait for all the amazingly topical Trump jokes you'll have for us in 2036.

The one thing that is really not appreciated is foreign money. Banks near the border are more likely to accept that, but my own bank, which is nowhere near the border, does not. Some places charge a fee for exchanging it, which ultimately reduces its value to the employee.
In the US the relatively simple act of exchanging currency can require substantial time and effort to locate, confirm, and process an exchange at one of the few locations that begrudgingly allow it. You can exchange a handful of common currencies at major international gateway airports or deal with one or two designated banks in a large city, but that's usually about it. Occasionally you'll find a third party exchange service elsewhere but in all cases the currency exchange rates provided in the US are surprisingly poor. As a result of these limitations receiving foreign currency in the US is indeed a major hassle. Unfortunately these limitations also mean that foreign visitors touring the US are restricted in their ability to exchange their own money before handing it over. If they're running low it's understandable that they'd start tipping in their local currency in order to save US currency for conventional spending.

A $2 dollar bill is U.S. currency. Anyone who doesn't accept it is actually breaking the law.
Source?
 
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tonys96

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I keep a two dollar bill behind my DL in my wallet. My Dad taught me to do that, so I would always have something in an emergency.
 

MikefromCrete

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We've been down this $2 path several times before. It always starts with the one poster who thinks its neat to use $2 bills for tips --- and it dissolves from there.
 

PVD

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$2 bills and dollar coins are fine as long as the total tip is reasonable. I used to carry lots of dollar coins because the NYC muni meters accepted them, and for commercial parking fees the pile of quarters was ridiculous. Now they take credit cards, and will do pay by phone soon, not as much of an issue. If I gave someone $3 in coin instead of $3 in bills nobody ever batted an eyelash as long as the amount was appropriate. The Fed was talking about stopping shipments of $2 bills to banks, that would make them somewhat less common. Canada has a dollar and a two dollar coin instead of paper, they save money over time compared to paper.
 

ericjeeper

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As for the source. Right on the front of the two dollar bill. Says this note is legal for all debt.
 

Devil's Advocate

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As for the source. Right on the front of the two dollar bill. Says this note is legal for all debt.
I asked for a source to the claim that refusing to accept a $2 bill is against the law. For instance, you could provide the name of the law that supposedly makes it illegal to refuse $2 bills. Then I would have a chance to counter your claim and so on. It's very simple so long as you're willing to put some actual effort into it.
 
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Alexandria Nick

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Mar 1, 2012
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Stamp machines in US post offices give $1 coins as change.
When I was in college, the football stadium had most of its concessions end in either .00 or .50, so they could make change faster using half dollars. The parking garages gave dollar coin change. That town was awash in half dollars and dollar coins!
 

PVD

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The concept of legal tender is often misunderstood. It refers to the validity of the currency, not a requirement that a specific person or business must take them. Plenty of businesses don't take cash, including many federal government agencies. some won't take certain size bills, and many machines only take a specific size bill or coin. Not illegal. But the simple fact is, if a good tip is x dollars and you leave it in $2bills or dollar coins most folks are happier than if you left a crappy tip with singles.
 

Radvlad

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I guess I was wrong. I thought legal tender had to be accepted. I can admit when I'm wrong.
 

neroden

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As for the source. Right on the front of the two dollar bill. Says this note is legal for all debt.
I asked for a source to the claim that refusing to accept a $2 bill is against the law.
It's the legal tender law. To understand it you have to know what the ancient term of art "legal tender" means. A "tender" is an offer made to settle a debt; as in "I'll tender you my car to pay off that debt I owe you" (that would be a tender but would not be a legal tender). A legal tender is a tender which by law must be accepted; if you don't accept it you are forgiving the debt. What constitutes legal tender has changed over time but right now all Federal Reserve Notes, US Notes, and US coins are legal tender.
It only applies to debt. As in, if you eat first and then are presented with a bill, you owe the restaurant a *debt* -- they are required to take *legal tender* as payment for it. If they ask you to pay *first* before they deliver the food (and refuse to give you the food unless you pay first), it isn't a debt, so legal tender does not apply.

The IRS is also required to take legal tender as payment for taxes -- since those are a debt -- though good luck finding the offices of the guys who are required by law to accept it.

The IRS also routinely attempts to violate the legal tender laws, but they're getting nailed for it, because it's quite unambiguous.

http://www.wnd.com/2014/07/dont-try-paying-irs-in-cash/

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/irs_will_refund_25k_penalty_imposed_on_unbanked_marijana_business_for_payin

The entire situation is widely misunderstood in two different ways. Some people think that everyone is required to take cash; no, you are only required to take cash *as payment for a debt* denominated in dollars. Some people think nobody is required to take cash. No, you must *always* accept cash as payment for a debt denominated in dollars -- if you don't accept a legal tender, you are legally forgiving the debt.

(Yes, this means you can go to the designated payment office of your credit card company and offer them cash to pay your credit card bill. They *must* take it or forgive the debt, and they cannot charge you any extra fees for taking cash. Every credit card issuer has at least one such designated office.)

A way to remember it: If the business makes you *prepay*, it doesn't have to take cash. If you pay *after getting the goods*, they do have to take cash.

I hope this was educational. :)
 
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PVD

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from the us treasury dept website faq section:


Page Content
I thought that United States currency was legal tender for all debts. Some businesses or governmental agencies say that they will only accept checks, money orders or credit cards as payment, and others will only accept currency notes in denominations of $20 or smaller. Isn't this illegal
The pertinent portion of law that applies to your question is the Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, entitled "Legal tender," which states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues."

This statute means that all United States money as identified above are a valid and legal offer of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person or an organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services. Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in pennies or dollar bills. In addition, movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations may refuse to accept large denomination currency (usually notes above $20) as a matter of policy.
 
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