USA Rail strike?

Help Support Amtrak Unlimited Discussion Forum:

caravanman

Engineer
Joined
Mar 22, 2004
Messages
4,621
Location
Nottingham, England.
On a UK railfans website there is discussion about a potential USA rail strike of freight operations around 90 days from now.
Given that Amtrak runs over freight lines, outside of the NEC, is there potential for Amtrak disruption too? I am thinking signal workers, track maintenance, etc?
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,766
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
On a UK railfans website there is discussion about a potential USA rail strike of freight operations around 90 days from now.
Given that Amtrak runs over freight lines, outside of the NEC, is there potential for Amtrak disruption too? I am thinking signal workers, track maintenance, etc?
Which freight line are they talking about? Different freight railroads have different issues.

The only recent news I have heard regarding strikes is that the BNSF unions have been instructed by the courts that they cannot strike over the recent work rule changes. Admittedly I have not been following this topic too closely.

Meanwhile apparently NJT, a commuter line, workers indulged in a bit of allegedly illegal work action the other day.

The US District Court issued an injunction against the Union (BLE&T) that includes imprisonment of members who absent themselves from work without good reason.

 
Last edited:

Dutchrailnut

Conductor
Joined
Jul 4, 2006
Messages
1,198
Location
Brookfield, Connecticut, USA
What was the purpose of the Railway Labor Act?


General Purposes.

The purposes of the RLA are to avoid any interruption of interstate commerce by providing for the prompt disposition of disputes between carriers and their employees and protects the right of employees to organize and bargain collectively.

How does the Railway Labor Act affect unions ability to strike?


The RLA also provides mandatory dispute resolution procedures that preclude strikes over union representation and grievance disputes, and postpones the ability of either party to take action in bargaining disputes until it has completed the process outlined in the Act.

When was the last railroad strike?


There has not been a national railroad strike since 1991. Historically, Congress steps in within hours with legislation ending a national railroad work stoppage, imposing a third-party settlement most often mirroring PEB recommendations.
 

JontyMort

Lead Service Attendant
Joined
May 4, 2021
Messages
270
Location
United Kingdom
Is the strike still on over there?
Yes, it is. It was Tuesday, Thursday (today), and Saturday. Obvious that caused - and was designed to cause - seven days’ chaos for the price of three. They have to give a certain period of notice - not sure when the next one is. This will run for a while IMO.
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,766
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
Strike authorization vote is taking place, though it does not necessarily mean there will be a strike...

 
Joined
Sep 2, 2021
Messages
737
Location
Lubec, ME
The RLA and all its subtlies will not allow any strike bfore 2023. Then congress will act after 1 or 2 days of a strike.
I wish they had something like this in the UK, where the RMT can randomly call a strike with only a few days notice, meaning people like myself with travel plans and little flexibility in dates are basically screwed.
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2021
Messages
737
Location
Lubec, ME
strikes are not meant to be convenient to company and passengers or they have no effect .
the RLA has enabled companies to hold unions hostage with losses at end after members basically vote yes to whatever is offered.
it makes negotiating a joke.
With a private company a strike is primarily workers vs. management and management suffers most of the consequences i.e. financial losses due to lack of business. Customers generally have alternatives - if Coke goes on strike they can buy Pepsi.

For a public service such as transit the strike is basically workers vs the public, needing maximum inconvenience to put pressure on government to cave. Government just passes on any increased costs to the taxpayer so they don't have the same incentive as a private company management does. In a place such as the UK transit is a key part of the transport system and loss of it has a big impact unlike the US where it is less of a factor with a few exceptions such as NYC
 
Top