Vonlane Bus Has A Texas Liquor License

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railiner

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In reading about the new carrier, "ROX", mention was made that they have applied for a liquor license from Virginia. I thought, "good luck with that", as I had thought that was against DOT regulations for line carrier's, and only permitted on fully chartered buses.
I compared ROX with Vonlane, their apparent business model, and was surprised to see that Vonlane already has a license to sell beer, wine, and liquor, on their Texas intrastate trips. Not yet on their interstate trip to Oklahoma.
They have a four drink limit, and don't permit passenger's to bring their own on board.

Check this out (scroll down to 'libation's'...


I don't know if I think this is a good idea, or not...it would depend on what Vonlane experiences, I suppose. Worst case scenario, an intoxicated passenger interfere's with the driver somehow, causing an accident.
 

Devil's Advocate

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I don't know if I think this is a good idea, or not...it would depend on what Vonlane experiences, I suppose. Worst case scenario, an intoxicated passenger interfere's with the driver somehow, causing an accident.
A drunk bus passenger is still better than a drunk driver but this is an area where trains have a distinct advantage safety wise. At the first sign of trouble a passenger can notify an attendant who can notify the conductor who can notify the authorities and have the engineer bring everything to a halt if needed. No method is perfect but I'd prefer to have my drinking related trouble on a train over a bus or plane.
 

rickycourtney

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I mean, they have attendants serving the drinks. I would imagine the attendant would cut off the passenger long before it got to that point.
 

railiner

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Planes and trains are safe, because the operator's are safely isolated from interference by the passenger. A bus driver is vulnerable. As far as the attendant 'cutting off' the passenger, that in of itself is sometimes what trigger's a disturbed person into a rage...
 

joelkfla

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Planes and trains are safe, because the operator's are safely isolated from interference by the passenger. A bus driver is vulnerable. As far as the attendant 'cutting off' the passenger, that in of itself is sometimes what trigger's a disturbed person into a rage...
As a coronavirus defense, the local transit agency in Orlando has installed locking plexiglass shields that isolate the driver on transit buses. I don't know whether these are also available for deluxe motor coaches.
 

railiner

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As a coronavirus defense, the local transit agency in Orlando has installed locking plexiglass shields that isolate the driver on transit buses. I don't know whether these are also available for deluxe motor coaches.
That's a good start, but not as good as what I have seen, riding buses in some Asian countries...once the passenger's have boarded the tour bus, an internal door is closed across the front of the aisle, and the driver and stepwell are in a secure 'cab'....polycarbonate windows allow forward viewing for passengers...
 

Bob Dylan

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I mean, they have attendants serving the drinks. I would imagine the attendant would cut off the passenger long before it got to that point.
You'd like to think so, but most bars sell alcohol to anyone who has the money and is over 21 and there are drunks in every bar in the country!( the more we sell, the more we make! Why are Bars Essential Businesses?
 
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jiml

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That's a good start, but not as good as what I have seen, riding buses in some Asian countries...once the passenger's have boarded the tour bus, an internal door is closed across the front of the aisle, and the driver and stepwell are in a secure 'cab'....polycarbonate windows allow forward viewing for passengers...
I can't see that being allowed in North America, as it would seem to block a path of egress in an emergency. Bus rolls, internal door won't open... not pretty.
 

railiner

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I can't see that being allowed in North America, as it would seem to block a path of egress in an emergency. Bus rolls, internal door won't open... not pretty.
You have a good point there...but the side windows and roof hatches offer several alternate means of emergency escape...I believe it also had a rear side door...
 

McIntyre2K7

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I mean, they have attendants serving the drinks. I would imagine the attendant would cut off the passenger long before it got to that point.
Correct the site says that each person over 21 can have a maximum of 4 drinks.

A drunk bus passenger is still better than a drunk driver but this is an area where trains have a distinct advantage safety wise. At the first sign of trouble a passenger can notify an attendant who can notify the conductor who can notify the authorities and have the engineer bring everything to a halt if needed. No method is perfect but I'd prefer to have my drinking related trouble on a train over a bus or plane.
I would assume that there will probably be a barrier between the driver and passengers to prevent an unruly passenger from attacking the driver.
 

Palmetto

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Here's what I want to know: as a former resident of "The Valley", when is this outfit going to start serving Brownsville/Harlingen/McAllen?😎:p
 

railiner

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Here's what I want to know: as a former resident of "The Valley", when is this outfit going to start serving Brownsville/Harlingen/McAllen?😎:p
Those points are not mentioned in their expansion plans. The only places mentioned are far away....Nashville and Atlanta. Kind of strange to start so far removed from their 'core' operating area. I suspect this particular expansion may be as a "franchise" to another operator....
 

Devil's Advocate

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I mean, they have attendants serving the drinks. I would imagine the attendant would cut off the passenger long before it got to that point.
You'd like to think so, but most bars sell alcohol to anyone who has the money and is over 21 and there are drinks in every bar in the country!
I visited my first bar in high school and decades later I can still count the number of times anyone was cut-off on one hand. Where I live most bars will keep on serving until you leave or pass out. It's been a similar story with planes, trains, and lounges too. The problem with drink based limits is that they don't account for pacing, tolerance, and pregaming. Some travelers will be able to manage five or six rounds easily while others will struggle with two. A bus is a confined space with few options for resolving a sudden threat, but I'd still prefer something like this over Greyhound or Turimex. I'd probably be willing to try Vonlane if it went where I was going and we weren't in the middle of a pandemic.
 
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Bob Dylan

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Here's what I want to know: as a former resident of "The Valley", when is this outfit going to start serving Brownsville/Harlingen/McAllen?😎:p
As a native Texan I have to ask, who would want to go there? lol
 

the_traveler

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Back in the 1990’s, I flew cross country in First Class. I admit that I don’t drink that much, but we had over a 3 hour ground delay on the taxiway due to weather (we say 1 1/2 movies and had our meal - even before we left the ground). With the free drinks in First Class,by the time I got to PVD, I was feeling good! They wheeled me off the plane!

They never cut me off. Any neither do many bars cut off customers - if they have the money! They figure that once the customer steps out the door, it’s not my problem anymore!
 

crescent-zephyr

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I can't see that being allowed in North America, as it would seem to block a path of egress in an emergency. Bus rolls, internal door won't open... not pretty.
It’s standard on almost every tour bus I’ve been on. Some of the older ones just have curtains but now it’s standard to have a door.

There are also doors in between the front lounge, bunks and back lounge / bedroom.
 

railiner

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It’s standard on almost every tour bus I’ve been on. Some of the older ones just have curtains but now it’s standard to have a door.

There are also doors in between the front lounge, bunks and back lounge / bedroom.
You're talking about an "entertainer" bus, used to privately haul bands and such....I'm talking about a 'sightseeing tour excursion' bus, with seats sold to the public...completely different things...
 

crescent-zephyr

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You're talking about an "entertainer" bus, used to privately haul bands and such....I'm talking about a 'sightseeing tour excursion' bus, with seats sold to the public...completely different things...
They are exactly the same thing.... they are prevost motor coaches being operated for commercial purposes.
 

railiner

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They are exactly the same thing.... they are prevost motor coaches being operated for commercial purposes.
Hardly the same thing...one is more like a private motor home, the other is just a seated highway bus...even though both share the same "bones" or chassis.
 
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