Quantcast

Wind Powered Cargo Sailing Ships

Help Support Amtrak Unlimited Discussion Forum:

NS VIA Fan

Conductor
Joined
Sep 24, 2011
Messages
1,690
Location
Nova Scotia
Wind Powered Cargo Sailing Ships. They're certainly starting on a small scale but with Michelin involved it might be something to watch.


The route would be Baltimore, Halifax, St. Pierre et Miquelon, and back to Saint-Nazaire, France

 
Last edited:

Dakota 400

Conductor
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Messages
2,555
Wind powered ships? I "vaguely" 😀 recall something like that having been done more than a Century ago.

I certainly support efforts to reduce carbon emissions. Climate change is a fact whether some choose to believe it or not. In my opinion as sometime trained in the sciences. (I also recognize that there are those of my colleagues so trained who do not agree with my thinking.) Using wind, the Sun for power: I'm for it. Practical at this time? No.

This "idea" reminds me of the "promise" of nuclear energy in propelling ships. How did that work out?

LNG now seems to be the fuel of the future for shipping. The first cruise ship to sail fueled by LNG is waiting for cruising to begin. But, how will that turn out?

What happens if a collision occurs with a ship being operated with LNG and another ship when the tanks containing LNG are breached?
 

PVD

Conductor
AU Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
5,202
Location
NYC/Queens
A major problem with LNG is lack of suitable supply at many ports. The company my brother in law worked for just had 2 containerships built (Philly Shipyard) , and they are capable of using LNG. LNG fueling for large is not available in the ports they serve. They made a commitment to the future, but it is a ways off.
 

Exvalley

Lead Service Attendant
AU Supporter
Joined
Jul 7, 2020
Messages
354
The problem is scalability. This ship will only carry 280 containers.
 

PVD

Conductor
AU Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
5,202
Location
NYC/Queens
Different market, the Matson ships are designed to serve a very well defined set of routes, and while not huge by world standards, are certainly not small. They are the largest built to date in the US, which is significant, they are used in Jones Act compliant service...
 

railiner

Conductor
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
8,863
Location
Palm Beach County
Matson is the largest US container shipping company in terms of TEU capacity, but it only ranks 22nd in the world.
Not sure, but I think the world's largest, the Maersk Line, may even own a US subsidiary company that is larger then Matson....
 

PVD

Conductor
AU Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
5,202
Location
NYC/Queens
Matson is in a very specialized market, they are primarily West Coast to Hawaii, and West Coast to Alaska, Jones Act and some Guam. They are not an all over the world carrier and their equipment is tailored to the services they run. their market share for the services they run is pretty high.
 

MARC Rider

Conductor
Joined
Apr 5, 2011
Messages
2,552
Location
Baltimore. MD
Wind powered ships? I "vaguely" 😀 recall something like that having been done more than a Century ago.
Railroad trains? That's so 19th century! And yet they're still rolling along. There are even sailing cruise ships in service. A niche market, I'll admit, but not everyone or everything needs to travel at the speed of sound.


This "idea" reminds me of the "promise" of nuclear energy in propelling ships. How did that work out?
Um, aren't most of the aircraft carriers and submarines in the US Navy powered by nuclear?
 

MARC Rider

Conductor
Joined
Apr 5, 2011
Messages
2,552
Location
Baltimore. MD
Not so sure this is a good idea, except maybe to the bean counters at the shipping companies. If world trade is conducted using an ever decreasing number of ever-larger ships, then one shipwreck could seriously disrupt world trade. In addition, wouldn't these new large super-duper containerships have trouble serving many ports, and thus require the taxpayers in all of these ports to spend lots of public money to upgrade their docks, dredge deeper channels and so forth. Perhaps the shipping companies should be required to do this. Of course, if that were the case, perhaps these huge ships wouldn't make as much economic sense to the shipping company.
 

railiner

Conductor
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
8,863
Location
Palm Beach County
This "idea" reminds me of the "promise" of nuclear energy in propelling ships. How did that work out?
This?



There's lots more on the web on this historic ship....
 

railiner

Conductor
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
8,863
Location
Palm Beach County
In addition, wouldn't these new large super-duper containerships have trouble serving many ports, and thus require the taxpayers in all of these ports to spend lots of public money to upgrade their docks, dredge deeper channels and so forth. .
Like this?

 

Exvalley

Lead Service Attendant
AU Supporter
Joined
Jul 7, 2020
Messages
354
If ships are going to burn oil, larger ships are more efficient and therefore better for the environment.
 

Dakota 400

Conductor
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Messages
2,555
This?



There's lots more on the web on this historic ship....
Thanks for posting the link to atomicinsights.com. That article refreshed my memory about why NS Savannah was built and its purpose.
 

PVD

Conductor
AU Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
5,202
Location
NYC/Queens
You can use any means of fuel or propulsion when money is no object. We also build some ships with gas turbines so they can achieve certain speeds. That works because we pay the bill. Most countries build conventional subs and carriers, only a few of the "big guys" run nukes
 
Top