Airo - Amfleet I replacement Siemens Inter City Trainsets (ICT) (2-3Q 2024)

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Does anyone know the traction motor arrangement on the Airo sets? I know the pantograph will be on the car directly behind the Charger locomotive. Will that pantograph supply power to traction motors just on that particular car only? Or will the pantograph supply power to the locomotive's traction motors? Or to both the car's and locomotive's traction motors?
There are traction motors in the trucks under the power car, and the motors in the ALCE-42 are also supplied with power from the power car. So there are in total four powered truck when running under catenary power. Only two powered trucks under diesel power since the total power available is limited by the power of the prime mover in that mode.
 
Springfield service will be run using some configuration of Airos.
The talk in the NEC commission planning documents is the New Haven - Springfield and valley Flyer Amtrak services will shift more towards through trains rather than locals. An eventual goal is hourly through train service between Springfield and New York. Some of these through trains will terminate at Springfield, some will serve Greenfield, others will take the inland route to Boston. Notably the Airo turnaround facility will be located at Springfield rather than New Haven which also supports this change in operations. CTDOT will fill in the local schedule between what Amtrak wants to run with locals.
 
Does anyone know the traction motor arrangement on the Airo sets?
https://www.esparail.org/resources/climate-change-and-rail/ (you need to scroll down a ways) indicates that at least under electric power, there will be three powered trucks. In theory, if you're traction limited instead of horsepower limited such as when accelerating from a dead stop, trying to avoid wheelslip, you might see a benefit from running the third powered truck. Additionally it may be helpful to dynamic brake via the APV axles in addition to the locomotive. However once you're moving you won't have enough power from the diesel to run every traction motor - they don't say one way or the other but I'd be very surprised if more than two trucks were powered most of the time when using the diesel.
 
https://www.esparail.org/resources/climate-change-and-rail/ (you need to scroll down a ways) indicates that at least under electric power, there will be three powered trucks. In theory, if you're traction limited instead of horsepower limited such as when accelerating from a dead stop, trying to avoid wheelslip, you might see a benefit from running the third powered truck. Additionally it may be helpful to dynamic brake via the APV axles in addition to the locomotive. However once you're moving you won't have enough power from the diesel to run every traction motor - they don't say one way or the other but I'd be very surprised if more than two trucks were powered most of the time when using the diesel.
Thank you for sharing that link. It makes sense to distribute traction to help with adhesion. I would suspect that 3 - 4 powered trucks will help with acceleration when compared to a similar length ACS-64 and 6 - 8 Amfleet cars. Perhaps, the new Airo trainsets will help shave a couple of minutes off the schedule.
 
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