Progress on the Chenab Bridge and the rest Kashmir Rail Link

Help Support Amtrak Unlimited Discussion Forum:

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,336
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
Installation of the arch crown for the lower segment of the arch of the Chenab Arch Bridge, the tallest rail bridge in the world that is under construction for the Kashmir Rail Link, took place on March 14th, 2021.

(Sorry for the commentary in Hindi but the pictures are pretty self explanatory)



The crown for the upper segment is expected to be in place by 31 March.
 

Ziv

OBS Chief
Joined
Oct 25, 2011
Messages
956
Impressive, but I wish the camera had panned out at the end to remind you of just how high this bridge is. It is way the heck up there.
The Chenab Bridge is 359 meters, 1178' above the riverbed and 322 meters or 1056' high above the river surface. It is hard to find a direct comparison of the numbers for the two bridges but I think that the New River Bridge is pretty impressive at a "mere" 267 meters above the river surface or 867' high so the Chenab Bridge is amazing.
I can't even imagine what it will be like to peer out the window of your railcar and look down, and down, and down...
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,336
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
Here you go...



The bridge deck apparently will have space for double track, though initially only a single track will be installed. The track will be electrified soon after it is installed since this entire route is slated to be a 25kV 50Hz electrified route, through Srinagar, all the way to Baramulla close to the Indian and Pak Kashmir LOC up north. The survey for electrification has been completed for the entire route, and electrification has been completed upto Katra from the South.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ziv

Bob Dylan

50+ Year Amtrak Rider
Joined
May 31, 2009
Messages
24,254
Location
Austin Texas
Here you go...



The bridge deck apparently will have space for double track, though initially only a single track will be installed. The track will be electrified soon after it is installed since this entire route is slated to be a 25kV 50Hz electrified route, through Srinagar, all the way to Baramulla close to the Indian and Pak Kashmir LOC up north. The survey for electrification has been completed for the entire route, and electrification has been completed upto Katra from the South.

How is India going to Generate all the "extra" juice needed to expand the routes?

Hopefully not with Coal!!
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,336
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
How is India going to Generate all the "extra" juice needed to expand the routes?

Hopefully not with Coal!!
Initially there will be quite a bit of coal in enormous Thermal plants with huge scrubbers - but that does not do anything about the CO2. There is some prototyping going on with Carbon sequestration at the exhaust, but nothing that can be immediately deployed AFAIK. This will still be important since the huge Thermal Plants are not going to get decommissioned anytime soon.

There is a significant Nuclear component, which is what will eventually account for the base load. India has in production Breeder Reactors to reprocess spent fuel to generate new fuel.

IR has a large Solar program where they are installing solar panels on all their property over time, but it will take a while for Battery technology to come upto par to provide reliable base load handling from that. The transition of power source is a thirty year plan in the minimum.
 
Last edited:

Bob Dylan

50+ Year Amtrak Rider
Joined
May 31, 2009
Messages
24,254
Location
Austin Texas
Initially there will be quite a bit of coal in enormous Thermal plants with huge scrubbers - but that does not do anything about the CO2. There is some prototyping going on with Carbon capture at the exhaust, but nothing that can be immediately deployed AFAIK.

There is a significant Nuclear component, which is what will account for the base load. India has in production Breeder Reactors to reprocess spent fuel to generate new fuel.

IR has a large Solar program where they are installing solar panels on all their property over time, but it will take a while for Battery technology to come upto par to provide reliable base load handling from that. The transition of power source is a thirty year plan in the minimum.
Glad to know they have a plan, unlike the USA who dithers as the World dies!

Coal kills! There is no such thing as " Clean Coal"!!!!
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,336
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
Glad to know they have a plan, unlike the USA who dithers as the World dies!

Coal kills! There is no such thing as " Clean Coal"!!!!
The alternative to Coal at present is Oil which needs to be imported from the Middle East, so it adds to the carbon load not only by itself getting burned but also in the exceedingly long supply route.

India is blessed with abundant supply of Coal and very little Oil, so it is what it is as they say. Oil costs foreign exchange to import which takes away from other better things to import.

The Railways have been electrified aggressively to reduce dependence on oil. The other thing that India has abundant supply of is Thorium, which drives the Nuclear power angle in the whole picture. Notwithstanding that Coal is simply not going away anytime soon. All that one can hope for is cleaning it up as much as possible.
 

Bob Dylan

50+ Year Amtrak Rider
Joined
May 31, 2009
Messages
24,254
Location
Austin Texas
The alternative to Coal at present is Oil which needs to be imported from the Middle East, so it adds to the carbon load not only by itself getting burned but also in the exceedingly long supply route.

India is blessed with abundant supply of Coal and very little Oil, so it is what it is as they say. Oil costs foreign exchange to import which takes away from other better things to import.

The Railways have been electrified aggressively to reduce dependence on oil. The other thing that India has abundant supply of is Thorium, which drives the Nuclear power angle in the whole picture. Notwithstanding that Coal is simply not going away anytime soon. All that one can hope for is cleaning it up as much as possible.
Thanks for the info, I understand but hope we dont go back to Coal like so many Republicans want us too!
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,336
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
Very impressive. But so is this one, especially considering it was built almost a century earlier....:)

Fortunately that one does not have to worry about 8.0 earthquakes and unstable rock formation in a range that is rising several mm a year in a very active and young fault zone though.
 

caravanman

Engineer
Joined
Mar 22, 2004
Messages
4,591
Location
Nottingham, England.
I gather that the push behind construction of this line is to facilitate military movements up to the border area? I am thinking that the new bridge looks a very tempting target if the worst happens...

I did visit Canon City some time ago, we tend to see what we expect to see, and I was confused for some hours about why the US had a Royal George bridge! :D
I missed seeing that bridge, but had an interesting drive up the Phantom Canyon trail, a former rail bed, to the old mining towns of Victor and Cripple Creek.
 

Ziv

OBS Chief
Joined
Oct 25, 2011
Messages
956
CaravanMan, I am no expert on this, but I think that though military transport is one driver, so to speak, perhaps larger is attempting to reduce transportation costs in a rather remote area that has ties pulling it politically in a couple different directions. Pakistan and India have disputed the "ownership" of this region for some time.
If India can make the people living in the region a bit more comfortable by increasing their standard of living, everyone comes out ahead. And if India can get more tourists to Srinagar, Shalimar Bagh, Gulmarg, etc., it will help them get a lot closer to doing so. Here is hoping that the locals end up as big winners in this!

I gather that the push behind construction of this line is to facilitate military movements up to the border area? I am thinking that the new bridge looks a very tempting target if the worst happens...

I did visit Canon City some time ago, we tend to see what we expect to see, and I was confused for some hours about why the US had a Royal George bridge! :D
I missed seeing that bridge, but had an interesting drive up the Phantom Canyon trail, a former rail bed, to the old mining towns of Victor and Cripple Creek.
 
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
9,804
Location
x
I did visit Canon City some time ago, we tend to see what we expect to see, and I was confused for some hours about why the US had a Royal George bridge! :D
It is indeed a wonder...the original "bridge to nowhere"...🤣

BTW...some trivia....the Royal Gorge Bridge is one of only three privately owned toll bridges in the USA. The other two are the Ambassador Bridge linking Detroit and Windsor, and the Dingman's Ferry Bridge across the Delaware between PA and NJ....
 

caravanman

Engineer
Joined
Mar 22, 2004
Messages
4,591
Location
Nottingham, England.
Sadly in the areas that you mention, Ziv, the locals are very polarised in their views. I hope that the railway will bring prosperity and some increased measure of peace to the region. UK tourists are currently advised not to visit the region because of potential unrest. :(
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,336
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
MODERATOR'S NOTE: A number of posts about the future Manali - Leh rail link that is planned and the current road that it will roughly follow, have been moved to its own thread. Please post about that link in the new thread and reserve this thread for the JUSBRL (Jammu - Udhampur- Srinagar- Baramula Rail Link and the world's highest bridge under construction on it.

Thank you for your understanding, cooperation and participation.
 

George Harris

Engineer
Joined
Apr 6, 2006
Messages
5,322
Location
finally! Back in Mississippi
It looks rather different to the drawing in post #5, have they forgotten the supporting towers and cables? ;)
The supporting towers and cables are only for construction to hold the two sides in position until the final connecting segment is set into position. At that point all the load is transferred to the arch and these temporary supports cease to be needed and can be removed.

This is an awesome structure. That it is probably being built for two tracks only makes sense. The width needed for lateral stiffness is probably more than sufficient for that. Notice how the arch gets wider toward the bottom. That is part of the lateral stiffness. Note also the foundations. There is tremendous horizontal force in line with the arch at the bottom of the arch, so that the sideways strength of the foundation, in line with the arch, is as important as the vertical load bearing ability.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: jis

caravanman

Engineer
Joined
Mar 22, 2004
Messages
4,591
Location
Nottingham, England.
The supporting towers and cables are only for construction to hold the two sides in position until the final connecting segment is set into position. At that point all the load is transferred to the arch and these temporary supports cease to be needed and can be removed.

This is an awesome structure. That it is probably being built for two tracks only makes sense. The width needed for lateral stiffness is probably more than sufficient for that. Notice how the arch gets wider toward the bottom. That is part of the lateral stiffness. Note also the foundations. There is tremendous horizontal force in line with the arch at the bottom of the arch, so that the sideways strength of the foundation, in line with the arch, is as important as the vertical load bearing ability.

I appreciate your expertise, and take my hat off to you...
Unfortunately, the original "artists impression" picture in post #5 that I was referring to, which was posted by Jis, has since been removed by Jis, so the context and meaning of my post about the towers and wires is now redundant.
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,336
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
I appreciate your expertise, and take my hat off to you...
Unfortunately, the original "artists impression" picture in post #5 that I was referring to, which was posted by Jis, has since been removed by Jis, so the context and meaning of my post about the towers and wires is now redundant.
That was a different bridge, not the Chenab Steel Arch Bridge. It was the Anji Khad single pillar Cable Stayed Box Girder bridge. Here is what it will look like when completed:

Anji-Khad-bridge-project-Kashmir-India-C-Italferr.jpg


Here is the Wikipedia article on it.


A recent article about it:


Incidentally the bridge deck for this bridge as well as the Chenab Bridge is 15m wide, about 3m more than necessary for a standard IR double track roadbed.
 
Last edited:
Top