Ireland rail - a few photos

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11.11.2021 Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary

Tiny station, single track line, 8 car parking bays and no space for more. Low cloud, intense drizzle with a stiff breeze, difficult to auto focus camera.
Even with the 'Irish' weather the station and small town had it's own charm.

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12.11.2021 Waterford, Co. Waterford

Small station with a modern center section. 2 lines which are separated by a fence, one for freight? and one for passenger traffic. Weather was mostly that it didn't rain or drizzle, sun came out for a few seconds on several occasions.

Waterford has just one bridge, this is a problem for the town as traffic snarls up seriously at anytime approaching rush hour. The station is on the north side of the river by the bridge, the bulk of the town is on the south side.

Tomorrow we travel by car to Wexford, we'll give the Passage East ferry a try. The south bank departing ferry has an interesting holding area for those waiting for the next ferry. Not too surprising is the Passage East ferry is located to the east of Waterford.

Waterford is an interesting and friendly city, mainly known for 'Waterford Crystal'. It has a good feel to it, the locals love to live there and even if they try another place on the planet for something different they appear to always return to where they were born, that's old and young. Yes we spent a lot of today speaking with locals.
There are several large technical and tech colleges in Waterford too, that helps to keep the town alive and vibrant. As does the amount of obvious cultural activities, in particular music, a sort of wet Austin TX.

From Waterford there are a handful of trains per day, but as with Mexico it is deluxe long distance buses that travel everywhere with great frequency.

Waterford, south bank
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One version of the station name
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Second version on the same platform
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Named after this man
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The passenger platform is locked and closed to public use until just a few minutes before a train arrives. After going through an intermediary I gained access to the slim Controller. He was an earnest man who took his job seriously. After explaining that the US Amtrak rail forum couldn't live without a photo taken from the banned platform he relented and opened the platform for your delectation, this is the best I could do.
On leaving he also pointed out a good vantage point from the road, maybe because he was pleased with the title slim, or that I promised that he would be famous in the USA?
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... and here is the road photo
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Edit: Some of the photos have become cropped, the text photo is particularly noticeable. Not sure how and why this has happened as full width photos were uploaded.
 
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I'll do my best but this isn't a rail travelogue as such as we flew from Paris to Dublin, were collected by family, rented a car to travel south, and will be driven back to Dublin Port to start the Irish Ferries Sail and Rail journey.

We've just popped into a few stations along our route as we know some on here like to see photos of European rail setups, we haven't used any rail services here at all.

The mask situation is pretty good with a high percentage wearing them in crowded or indoor situations, and all eating places have asked to see a vax certificate too, you are unlikely to get into an eatery without one.

Waterford is lovely, but every small town has some medieval parts in the center. For a really attractive and buzzing city center it is Kilkenny so far by a long way, a very good place to visit, and yes it has a rail station.
If you like very old cranky hotels with sloping floors, illogical passageways etc it can be found in Kilkenny too. Strangely enough the various practical aspects of the hotel functioned well, as does our hotel in Waterford which is on the river. Brilliant breakfast here and very good in Kilkenny. Both hotels are city center, just ask if you want the details and I'll post them here.

Tomorrow we are in Wexford, will be close to the rail station which is directly on the quay, try to get a few photos and impressions.

Almost to a person the people we have spoken to either working in hotels and shops etc or privately have been warm and welcoming, most with a permanent smile as well.

I will write up how Sail and Rail works but that may be delayed for a week, depends on what we find when we arrive back in England.

If you have specific questions just ask away, happy to oblige.
 

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13.11.2021 Passage East, Co. Waterford

Small hamlet down river from Waterford with a good sized ferry across the river Barrow, the estuary broadens out dramatically after this point.
Weather bright with no rain, very pleasant.

Drove through narrow streets to the quay just as the gates to the ferry closed and the prop wash started to show. Parked in the the entry lane and to our complete amazement the ferry reversed a little, gates opened and we were waved up the ramp. Only in Ireland.
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The entirety of Passage East
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Ferry from the opposite river bank at Ballyhack
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One of the most beautiful estuaries I have ever seen, the photo doesn't come close.
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On the road to Wexford we came across this small disused railway station at Welliingtonbridge, here 52.267783, -6.754551 . While on the subject of Irish rail we stopped, trespassed and took a few photos.
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Wexford rail station, closed up except for arrivals and departures from/to Rosslare ferry port. The line is the Rosslare Europort Service, could this be one of the shortest national rail services anywhere in the world at 23 minutes?
Have to write that the station building just 40m from the quay is a little underwhelming.
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I used to have two cast iron wood stoves made by Waterford Stove Works, a Stanley cook stove and a Reginald. The Reginald had a casting of Reginald's Tower on the side. Did you get to see the tower, and did you know about the stove works?

Yes we did see and walk past the tower several times, it's in an area called the Viking Triangle. The tower is very close to the river which would tie in with the Viking seafarers.

I knew of Waterford stoves but never came across one. They were well thought of in the UK but our market was French and Belgian antique stoves so Waterford were outside of our expertise. Did you think they were a good stove?

Are you all ready for winter yet or is there still a bit to do?

It's been an interesting and most enjoyable journey so far, tomorrow we visit the Famine Ship in New Ross. The town or the area have a heavy connection to the US Kennedy family, will find out more tomorrow.

The big standout through the whole country so far is their sense of community is very important to them, they put a lot of effort into keeping it like that too.
 

oregon pioneer

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I loved both my Waterford stoves, however my hubby said when I met him that he had a better wood cook stove. I had to admit he was right. Our current Pioneer Maid cook stove is a dream. It is made by the Amish, who should know what it takes to produce a stove that does it all: cooks, heat water, and warms our house. The Reginald was much like any other small box heater (similar to Jotul). We are still out there thinning our forest for firewood (which will have to be dried for two years before we will put it into the woodshed).

Here is our Pioneer Maid stove:
tea21.jpg bread20_cookstove.jpg firewood_fall21a.jpg
 

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Just back in the north after a long wet drive from the south, and must be out early tomorrow too. I'm curious, what is the timber you are burning?
 

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It is all Ponderosa pine. Not generally considered top quality firewood, but it's what we have, and it burns well if handled properly.
View attachment 25517
That's a beautiful looking forest, you must work hard at keeping it that clear. Exactly as you say, providing it is handled properly.

Do you know how old the trees are, I'm not very familiar with pine, our area is oak and beech/hornbeam.
 

Bob Dylan

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That's a beautiful looking forest, you must work hard at keeping it that clear. Exactly as you say, providing it is handled properly.

Do you know how old the trees are, I'm not very familiar with pine, our area is oak and beech/hornbeam.
Pine trees are fast growing Jamie, thus Lumber Companies can cut and re-plant seedlings and have more Trees to cut quicker than other types of trees.

As Jennifer said, Pine is not considered quality wood, it's soft and isn't especially prized as Fire Wood. Around Central Texas Oak and Cedar are the Firewood one sees most often, although there aren't a lot of days where Fires for Heat are needed.FIreplaces are more for show than for real Heat.
 
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14.11.2021 New Ross, Co. Wexford

No rail this post, but there is a faithful replica of an Irish 'Famine Ship' the Dunbrody. Built from the plans of the original ship, enabled by the Kennedy Trust.

President Kennedy's family sailed from New Ross on such a ship in the 1840's. They farmed near Dunganstown just a few km from the quay they set sail from.
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The replica Dunbrody on a misty morning
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Accommodation for steerage passengers was about 265 paying souls per voyage on the Dunbrody, usually between 5 to 15 died per sailing. Dependant on destination, conditions and weather the crossing time to Canada or the USA was between 4-10 weeks.
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Steerage passengers were only allowed on deck 1 hour per day, to cook.
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How the bunks were allocated
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Typical steerage scene
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View from the wheel
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This was one of the most interesting and human of museums for us, the ship felt very real too. Highly recommended if you are interested American history or are of Irish heritage.

Next up this coming Thursday is our journey on Irish Ferries Sail and Rail, Dublin Port to London, Euston railway station and beyond.
 
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MARC Rider

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As Jennifer said, Pine is not considered quality wood, it's soft and isn't especially prized as Fire Wood.

Pine, as well as other softwoods like spruce and fir burn very quickly, so you really need to keep feeding the fire to keep it going. The wood also contains a lot of resins, which don't fully burn and clog up the chimney or stovepipe with potentially dangerous creosote buildup if it's not cleaned frequently.

Around Central Texas Oak and Cedar are the Firewood one sees most often, although there aren't a lot of days where Fires for Heat are needed.FIreplaces are more for show than for real Heat.
The oak is needed to feed the long burning fires needed to smoke the famous Texas barbecue brisket and other barbecued goodies.
 

Bob Dylan

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Pine, as well as other softwoods like spruce and fir burn very quickly, so you really need to keep feeding the fire to keep it going. The wood also contains a lot of resins, which don't fully burn and clog up the chimney or stovepipe with potentially dangerous creosote buildup if it's not cleaned frequently.



The oak is needed to feed the long burning fires needed to smoke the famous Texas barbecue brisket and other barbecued goodies.
Actually, PitMasters prefer Mesquite @ alot of the Famous Texas Q Joints!
 

anumberone

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14.11.2021 New Ross, Co. Wexford

No rail this post, but there is a faithful replica of an Irish 'Famine Ship' the Dunbrody. Built from the plans of the original ship, enabled by the Kennedy Trust.

President Kennedy's family sailed from New Ross on such a ship in the 1840's. They farmed near Dunganstown just a few km from the quay they set sail from.
View attachment 25522


The replica Dunbrody on a misty morning
View attachment 25523

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Accommodation for steerage passengers was about 265 paying souls per voyage on the Dunbrody, usually between 5 to 15 died per sailing. Dependant on destination, conditions and weather the crossing time to Canada or the USA was between 4-10 weeks.
View attachment 25527

Steerage passengers were only allowed on deck 1 hour per day, to cook.
View attachment 25528

How the bunks were allocated
View attachment 25529

Typical steerage scene
View attachment 25530

View from the wheel
[ATTACH type="full" alt="s7
This was one of the most interesting and human of museums for us, the ship felt very real too. Highly recommended if you are interested American history or are of Irish heritage.

Next up this coming Thursday is our journey on Irish Ferries Sail and Rail, Dublin Port to London, Euston railway station and beyond.
Fine looking ship, miserable conditions.
 

oregon pioneer

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Do you know how old the trees are, I'm not very familiar with pine, our area is oak and beech/hornbeam.
The majority of the trees in the photo are 130-150 years old.

Pine, as well as other softwoods like spruce and fir burn very quickly, so you really need to keep feeding the fire to keep it going. The wood also contains a lot of resins, which don't fully burn and clog up the chimney or stovepipe with potentially dangerous creosote buildup if it's not cleaned frequently.

I am the chief chimney sweep here. Luckily, we have single story house, and the roof has a low pitch with good footing. I sweep the chimney every couple months in winter.

In addition, we have a cold/dry climate that supports slow-growing pine that lives 300-500 years or more. It is a different beast than southern pine, with its fine tight grain. It burns much slower, hotter and cleaner, especially when dried for 24 months as we do. The old-growth wood that is found here is used for fine window sash and trim. Not much of that left, they actually thought they would cut it all down but got stopped in the 1990s by environmental regulation. There is one sawmill left in our county.

To tie into the rail theme -- there used to be logging railroads up many of the creeks, including the ones on both sides of our ridge,and they took them out after they got the best trees. There was also a railroad into Seneca, our nearest tiny town, and a mill there. The mill and railroad closed and in the mid-1980s. Here's a photo from the nearby Malheur National Forest, where there are more old trees left than we have on our place:
ski_feb22f.jpg
 

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The majority of the trees in the photo are 130-150 years old.




I am the chief chimney sweep here. Luckily, we have single story house, and the roof has a low pitch with good footing. I sweep the chimney every couple months in winter.

In addition, we have a cold/dry climate that supports slow-growing pine that lives 300-500 years or more. It is a different beast than southern pine, with its fine tight grain. It burns much slower, hotter and cleaner, especially when dried for 24 months as we do. The old-growth wood that is found here is used for fine window sash and trim. Not much of that left, they actually thought they would cut it all down but got stopped in the 1990s by environmental regulation. There is one sawmill left in our county.

To tie into the rail theme -- there used to be logging railroads up many of the creeks, including the ones on both sides of our ridge,and they took them out after they got the best trees. There was also a railroad into Seneca, our nearest tiny town, and a mill there. The mill and railroad closed and in the mid-1980s. Here's a photo from the nearby Malheur National Forest, where there are more old trees left than we have on our place:
View attachment 25550
Those trees are very elegant. Thanks for the info and the picture you paint Jennifer re using this type of timber.
 

cirdan

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I used to have two cast iron wood stoves made by Waterford Stove Works, a Stanley cook stove and a Reginald. The Reginald had a casting of Reginald's Tower on the side. Did you get to see the tower, and did you know about the stove works?

wow , I have a Jotul cooking stove of recent manufacture that looks almost identical to that except that it has different insignia on the side . Despite its tiny size it is a fierce little burner that is quick to start up and great fun to cook on .
 

cirdan

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11.11.2021 Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary

Tiny station, single track line, 8 car parking bays and no space for more. Low cloud, intense drizzle with a stiff breeze, difficult to auto focus camera.
Even with the 'Irish' weather the station and small town had it's own charm.

View attachment 25444


View attachment 25445
Is that a steam locomotive of some sort in front of the shed?
 

cirdan

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And the river is highly tidal there too, so why not Seabridge and do away with ' Water' completely?
For fear of spoiling a joke, The name Waterford has nothing to do with water and nothing to do with ford but comes from the Norse (Viking) Veðrafjǫrðr meaning ram's fjord. The town was first established as a landing point and trading post by Viking settlers. It's Gaelic name is Port Láirge. Waterford has a county named after it and is famous across the world for its Waterford Crystal.
 
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For fear of spoiling a joke, The name Waterford has nothing to do with water and nothing to do with ford but comes from the Norse (Viking) Veðrafjǫrðr meaning ram's fjord. The town was first established as a landing point and trading post by Viking settlers. It's Gaelic name is Port Láirge. Waterford has a county named after it and is famous across the world for its Waterford Crystal.
Wonderful!

The range of knowledge on this forum is amazing, only here on AU.
 

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Is that a steam locomotive of some sort in front of the shed?
I've expanded the original photo, it's impossible to say. That day the drizzle or mist was so fine but also so heavy I had difficulty getting the camera to focus, expanding the photo doesn't add a whole lot more to the detail.
 
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