Texas Central Railway

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Anderson

Conductor
Joined
Nov 16, 2010
Messages
9,563
To be fair, in a number of cases since we're "starting fresh" (or close enough to it) we can avoid some of the mid-trip stub-end-station issues that come up...but there are some cases where it can't be helped (e.g. transiting NYP from PHL-ALB). In a number of European countries, I think part of the issue is dealing with having inherited constricted/stub-end stations. Also, there are a few cities (London, Paris) where you have "lots of terminals and nothing runs through" (London is slowly working through this; Paris...not so much).
 

cirdan

Conductor
Joined
Mar 30, 2011
Messages
2,376
Also, there are a few cities (London, Paris) where you have "lots of terminals and nothing runs through" (London is slowly working through this; Paris...not so much).
Actually, I am under the impression that Paris has done much more to relieve the situation than London.

For suburban services there is the RER which is basically a collection of inherited suburban lines that have been interconnected by a series of (mostly) new-build tunnels going under the heart of Paris, meaning that suburban trains that start in say the northern suburbs can run through into the southern suburbs while making several stops in the deep heart of Paris. Of course there are still quite a few suburban trains that do end in the old terminus stations, but you can't really compare this to London where there is only one line that runs through and where there will soon be a second, but even after that opens the vast majority of commuters and the vast majority of terminus stations will remain unaffected.

For Intercity trains the picture is similar. In London I cannot think of one single Intercity train service that serves London without terminating there. There was at one time talk of running trains from places like Manchester and Birmingham through to Paris, and the terminus of Eurostar was moved from Waterloo to St Pancras for this purpose, but the rest of the plan was not followed upon and probably never will be, at least not within the next 20 or 30 years.

In Paris, a high speed by-pass was built in circa 1990s serving Charles de Gaulle airport, and there are now numerous TGVs that connect cities in the north to cities in the south. Even seasonal trains from London.
 

neroden

Conductor
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
7,752
What happened to the judge's decision last spring saying Texas Central was not yet a RR ?
Contradicted a ruling that it was a railroad from a different lower court, so they're going to appeals court. I am quite certain Texas Central will win; the ruling claiming it wasn't a railroad because it wasn't up and running yet has no basis in law, as most of the 19th century railroads who used eminent domain weren't up and running when they used it.
 

me_little_me

Conductor
Joined
Jul 16, 2010
Messages
3,021
The Man is seat 61 says the following about forward-facing seats: (you'll have to scroll down to the section on how to reserve forward-facing seats.)

"I know from experience that American visitors in particular (if you'll forgive me for saying so) are obsessed with facing forwards. Europeans less so, as we are used to trains with half the seats facing one way, half the other, and we know that it's no big deal as trains run smoothly on rails - think cruise liner restaurant, where half the diners are going backwards at 18 knots without noticing!"

I think that if Americans want high speed rail, they're going to have to get used to the possibility of sitting facing backwards. :)
For some, like my wife, riding backwards is nauseating. When we traveled in Europe and reserved seats, it was interesting trying to explain to some agents that we wanted to sit side by side facing forward for that reason. Of course, that was in the old days of wooden ships and iron men!

On our Brightline trip, we had to get the ticket agent to change our seats.
 
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John Bredin

OBS Chief
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Messages
689
The Rail Passengers Association (ex-NARP) reported Friday that a group of GOP legislators with support from an anti-rail group are attempting to have U.S. DOT pull the regulatory rug out from under the Texas Central, using the coronavirus emergency as a fig-leaf for their general desire to kill the project.

Hopefully, RPA is correct that it's a hail-Mary pass, as these yahoos have failed in their efforts so far, but it sounds like this matter hasn't been as high as the desk of the Sec'y of Transportation until now. Considering who's Chaos's Chao's husband -- Mitch McConnell, obstructionist extraordinaire -- I wouldn't be so sanguine.

RPA Hotline containing story.
 

Devil's Advocate

Conductor
Joined
May 24, 2010
Messages
11,234
Texas Centeal wins a very important Appeals Court ruling which stated that it is legally a railroad. This ruling overturned a lower court ruling.
This is good news but the anti-rail lobby will never give up and there are more appeals and delays where this came from. Texas Central had to layoff 28 staff in response to the pandemic while the anti-rail lobby has expanded to 28 zero-tolerance legislators undaunted by any setbacks and salivating over the chance to kill high speed rail in a newly purple state still dominated by cowboy logic, severe gerrymandering, and rural favoritism.

Texans Against High-Speed Rail [...] released a statement saying the couple intends to appeal to the state supreme court. [...] The court win comes as Texas Central scaled back its current staff in the state, citing the effects of COVID-19 on global economies. Critics, including Rep. Kevin Brady, R-The Woodlands, said reducing staff demonstrated the project — long assailed by rural residents who say it will ruin their way of life — was losing momentum.
Link...

In two separate letters to U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, 28 state lawmakers and two members of Congress said work by the Federal Railroad Administration on the Texas Central Railway project — which has faced stiff opposition for six years even as Dallas and Houston officials showed support — should stop entirely.
Link...
 
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cirdan

Conductor
Joined
Mar 30, 2011
Messages
2,376
Contradicted a ruling that it was a railroad from a different lower court, so they're going to appeals court. I am quite certain Texas Central will win; the ruling claiming it wasn't a railroad because it wasn't up and running yet has no basis in law, as most of the 19th century railroads who used eminent domain weren't up and running when they used it.
Yes, this would seem so obvious. Makes you wonder why the court didn't see it that way. Surely any lawyer who had done minimal preparatory research should have spotted that argument and brought it up.
 

Bob Dylan

Conductor
Joined
May 31, 2009
Messages
19,399
Yes, this would seem so obvious. Makes you wonder why the court didn't see it that way. Surely any lawyer who had done minimal preparatory research should have spotted that argument and brought it up.
Texas has LOTS and Lots of Lawyers, in other words Lots of Bad Lawyers, especially in the Courts here.( they're Elected and Politics is what matters, not Legal Competence.)

Our Supreme Court is noted for always siding with Corporations so the Texas Central should prevail.
 
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