Midwest Venture Introduction

Help Support Amtrak Unlimited Discussion Forum:

MikefromCrete

Engineer
Joined
Mar 24, 2009
Messages
2,787
Location
Crete, IL
Seeing that the new state-owned cars just went into service on Tuesday, there haven't been any reports (that I've seen) on the comfort of the seats. One poster on AU has complained about Brightline seats, but that it.
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,724
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
That's the way the newest Economy airline seats work.
That is how even the most expensive Sleeper pod seats work too on airliners, as do the Viewliner and Superliner Sleeper seats on Amtrak ;)

The beef in this case is more about the amount of tilt and thickness of cushion more than how it is done I think. Both are still thicker than Y/Y+ seats on airlines and the seats are wider too by several inches.

The front seat not landing in the laps of the person behind is on the whole a good thing I think.
 
Last edited:

Arctifox

Train Attendant
Joined
Jun 23, 2021
Messages
28
Location
D.C.
I think so too - if one wants to recline their seat it doesn't affect the one behind them.

Does anyone know if the new coaches have been used on the same trains every day (303 and 306 I think it was) and/or if it is planned to keep them on this round trip?
 

rtabern

Conductor
Joined
Nov 15, 2006
Messages
1,606
Location
Northwest Wisconsin
Does anyone know if the new cars have remained on 303 this past week? We are planning to ride on Wednesday from Chicago to Pontiac on 303 and back on 422. Thanks in advance!
 

jpakala

Service Attendant
Joined
Jul 13, 2014
Messages
136
I had no discomfort at all riding Brightline coach seating and the new Amtrak Chicago to St. Louis coach seats look fine to me (although I look forward to the comfort of Business Class when those cars are ready). I agree with JP1822 (someone confined to a wheelchair for a lengthy period) about the wider aisles not being necessary.
 

daybeers

Conductor
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
1,602
Location
NHV
I think wider aisles are necessary even if the only reason is allowing more space for those to pass while someone is stowing luggage/getting settled when they're boarding or alighting the train. It's also an awkward dance of trying not to bother the conductor who is checking tickets when traversing the aisle. Having to dip into someone's leg space is far from ideal.
 

jpakala

Service Attendant
Joined
Jul 13, 2014
Messages
136
Airplane aisles (narrower yet) are impassable, but then again people are to stay in their one-narrow-size-fits-all seats. As to reclining, if one's seatback doesn't recline it's hard to see how that's much different from a wall-like situation where your back is what suffers as your seat and legs slip forward.
 

Willbridge

50+ Year Amtrak Rider
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
1,852
Location
Denver
I like the windows as compared to the Amfleet but I think that even larger windows were offered at one time. Are there structural trade-offs (other than with SSL or dome windows)?

1968 SP coach.jpg
 

Cal

Engineer
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Messages
3,858
Location
Socal
Thanks for that! Nice pictures in there, though I have to disagree with them saying it's a good paintjob...I think they could've done better. Here's the link without the tracking :) New Trains in the Midwest
I agree, Amtrak could've at least had the paint match up correctly between the locomotive and cars. I also think that Brightline did better with the interior. I'm not quite sure how, but their interior just feels more light and modern.
 

neroden

Engineer
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
9,549
Location
Ithaca, NY
The wider aisles solve a *lot* of problems. While they may not seem to matter on an all-coach train, they make it *possible* for someone in a wheelchair to go to the cafe car. That's a big deal.

It also makes it more flexible, and perhaps quicker, to board and deboard passengers in wheelchairs at short platforms -- you do not absolutely have to platform every single car where someone in a wheelchair is getting on and off, since it's possible to move between cars.

It also (yep, third benefit!) increases the redundancy of car-mounted wheelchair lifts. If you're depending on car-mounted lifts and one fails, anyone in a wheelchair in that car is screwed -- unless they can roll into the next car.

(Car mounted lifts have become the preferred and default option, over station mounted lifts, due to a combination of more redundancy -- if the only station-mounted lift at a station is broken, nobody can get on or off there -- and requiring fewer lifts to be purchased total. This default is now specified in federal regulation.)
 

daybeers

Conductor
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
1,602
Location
NHV
I agree with all your points except
It also (yep, third benefit!) increases the redundancy of car-mounted wheelchair lifts. If you're depending on car-mounted lifts and one fails, anyone in a wheelchair in that car is screwed -- unless they can roll into the next car.
The ventures only have a wheelchair lift in the cafe cars, which are not constructed yet. If that lift fails, a wheelchair user can't roll into the next car and use that car's lift.
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,724
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
I agree, Amtrak could've at least had the paint match up correctly between the locomotive and cars. I also think that Brightline did better with the interior. I'm not quite sure how, but their interior just feels more light and modern.
Actually, Amtrak couldn't have, since none of it is owned by Amtrak ;) If anyone could have it is IDOT who are the designated managers of the acquisition of the Midwest rolling stock from Siemens.
 

Trogdor

BURNiNATOR
Joined
Aug 3, 2004
Messages
5,927
Location
Here
Actually, Amtrak couldn't have, since none of it is owned by Amtrak ;) If anyone could have it is IDOT who are the designated managers of the acquisition of the Midwest rolling stock from Siemens.

It has been noted (maybe on here?) that the Siemens Charger paint scheme was designed to match the Nippon Sharyo bilevels that never got built. I’ve seen some mention that the locomotives will be re-striped at some point to match the single-level cars.
 

jis

Chief Dispatcher
Staff member
Administator
Moderator
Gathering Team Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
32,724
Location
Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
It has been noted (maybe on here?) that the Siemens Charger paint scheme was designed to match the Nippon Sharyo bilevels that never got built. I’ve seen some mention that the locomotives will be re-striped at some point to match the single-level cars.
Yep. The owners can stripe it whichever way they wish.
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
6,216
Location
NYC/Queens
I don't think it has sunk in yet for some people that these cars are operated by Amtrak, not spec'd, purchased, or owned by Amtrak. The Midwest Consortium and California, with IDOT in the lead called the shots. Comments have also been made about how people won't like the interior or seats when they go into widespread service for Amtrak, when we don't even know yet what seats they will actually buy.
 

Mailliw

OBS Chief
Joined
Jun 14, 2020
Messages
604
Location
Scranton, PA
Indeed, there's enough lead time for the Amfleet replacements for Amtrak to take advantage of passenger feedback re the CA/IDOT seating arrangements.
 
Top