Scanners, Radio and Other such tech inquiries

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Irelandvegas65

Train Attendant
Joined
Feb 23, 2021
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Location
Rockford
I have been watching videos for my October 2021 Empire to Coast Starlight to Zephyr journey. One piece of tech I have seen are Scanners, tuned to Amtrak frequencies. It looks like a fun, and useful item, but a few minutes on Amazon show a great cost for a none regular Amtrak passenger. Can these be rented and programmed without buying one?

I also have an older stand along Garmin and wondered it it might be something to bring along, or will the iPhone do enough for tracking progress? I realize Data will be mostly none existent for big distances on the routes.

Thanks, I appreciate your responses and collected wisdom!
 

mcropod

Lead Service Attendant
Joined
Jan 29, 2018
Messages
333
Location
Oz
I brought along a scanner for my trips and had a bit of fun with it. I likely didn't get the value from it that a true Amtrakphile would have because I wasn't up with all the details of the various tracks I was on. However, I did still enjoy hearing the axle-count at all the monitoring places I passed, and knowing that none had dropped off since the last report.

My scanner was bought before I left Oz and I had no probs loading the frequency-ranges I found out would apply.

I did bring along a suitably-USA/Canada maploaded Garmin GPS which was very useful throughout. I got great value from that helping me work out exactly where I was, and at what speed I was travelling, which perfectly suited my fact-based personality :) It also let me operate in kilometres and kph rather than having to try to make sense of the bushels, or farenheit, or ounces, or whatever it is that you lot use to measure distance and speed.

I'll be taking that GPS with me as I take to the trains on Far North Queensland in a couple of days. I'll ditch the foreign maps chip and have it on home territory. I'll likely not take the scanner, at least in part because I'll be hearing the exchanges of the driver and crew direct in the rail-car.
 

PVD

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Obviously, the lack of a signal makes the internet radio option less than perfect, although in some areas of the country (like the NE) it isn't bad. If you aren't using it outside of an occasional trip, I guess it could be more than some would spend, but some folks use them for other scanning/listening in their "home areas" If the services in your area haven't gone digital, a decent handheld scanner is not terribly expensive, and many people like to listen on a train an earpiece/headset is proper behavior, unless in a private room. There are great online listings of the frequencies for specific routes, and a usb cable to a pc is all you need to program in whatever suits your trips
 

Eric in East County

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Like most North American railroads, AMTRAK still uses VHF for its radio communications. To be able to listen in on these transmissions, all that is needed is a handheld VHF scanner small enough to pack along in a carry-on bag. Assuming you don’t already have a suitable handheld scanner, acquiring one shouldn’t be too difficult or expensive. Models that sold for hundreds of dollars a few years ago can now be picked up quite reasonably on the used equipment market. (I use a little Uniden SC230 scanner that I bought on eBay for only a few dollars.)

Here are a few features to look for when shopping for a radio that will scan railroad frequencies:

The capacity to receive frequencies of from 160.215 to 161.565 MHz. (This is where most railroads operate their main voice communications networks.)

The optional capacity to receive the 450 to 470 MHz UHF band. (AMTRAK’s On-Board Service personnel sometimes use these frequencies to facilitate family and group activities.)

A sufficient number of programmable channels for storing all of the frequencies you plan to listen to. (Believe it or not, 20 channels will usually be sufficient!)

The capacity to lock out certain channels so that they won’t be scanned.

A “close call” feature that allows searching for nearby active frequencies.

A “hold” feature that stops the radio from scanning and pauses it on a particular frequency.

An external earphone jack. (Wearing earphones is a “must” if you plan use your scanner in an open coach or other public spaces.)

Some might also want to add battery-charging capabilities to this list. I use disposable batteries but make it a point to pack along my scanner’s AC adapter. Most AMTRAK passenger cars now offer conveniently located AC power outlets for those passengers who want to use their laptop computers and other electronic devices at their seats. Taking advantage of this amenity can greatly prolong battery life.

The AMTRAK Radio Frequencies page of the On Track On Line website: On Track On Line - Amtrak Radio Frequencies has most of the frequencies used by various AMTRAK trains such as the “Southwest Chief,” the “Capitol Limited,” and the “Texas Eagle.” These frequencies should be reasonably current since they are updated on a regular basis using information provided by rail fans.
 

Devil's Advocate

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I have been watching videos for my October 2021 Empire to Coast Starlight to Zephyr journey. One piece of tech I have seen are Scanners, tuned to Amtrak frequencies. It looks like a fun, and useful item, but a few minutes on Amazon show a great cost for a none regular Amtrak passenger. Can these be rented and programmed without buying one? I also have an older stand along Garmin and wondered it it might be something to bring along, or will the iPhone do enough for tracking progress? I realize Data will be mostly none existent for big distances on the routes. Thanks, I appreciate your responses and collected wisdom!
These days handheld radio scanners are a niche product for a shrinking audience. A scanner tuned to rail broadcasts mainly receives automated readouts and some brief industry jargon around longer stops. The only time it gets really interesting is when something important goes wrong or there is a major disruption on the line. Scanners are great for spotting from a car but one or two rides on Amtrak is unlikely to feel like a good value for the money and effort spent. Most of the time scanners resemble a noisy electronic brick that needs to be carried with you in the hope that something interesting happens. A set of travel size binoculars is likely to be cheaper and more interesting.
 
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zephyr17

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Jul 22, 2009
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Washington State
I love my scanner and take it on every trip. You hear chatter between the engineer and conductor, the crew and dispatcher (relatively little in CTC territory, though). The trackside detectors sounding off.

You often get to find out what the crew isn't telling anyone (the reason the train went into emergency braking was because the duct tape fell off the brake line. True story).

With that said, it is probably a lot more interesting to a dedicated railfan. Choose whether you want one based on your knowledge of, and interest in, railroad operations.
 

Eric in East County

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Some of the most commonly encountered railroad transmissions are those from Radio Alarm Detectors or RADs. Sometimes referred to as “talking detectors” or “draggers,” these trackside devices check for broken wheels, broken axes, overheated wheel bearings and journal boxes (referred to as “hotboxes” by railroad personnel), and oversized loads that could strike bridges, tunnels, or trackside structures. After a train passes it, a RAD uses an electronically synthesized “voice” to transmit a radio report to the train crew. A typical RAD announcement will give its location (usually expressed as a mile post number), the train’s speed, the ambient temperature, and the total axle count. If no problems are found, the report will conclude with, “no defects.” Located about every 20 miles or so along the main lines, RADs typically transmit on the primary road frequency. (Listening for these reports is a good way to verify that you are tuned to the frequency your train is currently using.)

While most railroad transmissions are routine, there will be exceptions that are usually related to mechanical problems, the weather and other natural phenomena, or the “human element.” Being able to listen in on a train’s radio communications will help you to keep appraised of these situations while they are taking place. Here are few examples of out-of-the-ordinary events that we monitored on our rail trips:

- While traveling from San Diego to San Juan Capistrano, our “Pacific Surfliner” suddenly came to a complete and unexpected halt. Turning on the scanner, we heard the main line dispatcher tell our engineer that a slight earthquake had just occurred and that he should proceed at 25 miles per hour until the tracks ahead had been inspected for possible damage.

- We had just departed Galesburg, Illinois onboard an eastbound “Zephyr” when an announcement was made to stop the train because of a medical emergency in one of the coaches. This was followed by a request for assistance from any trained medical personnel who might be on board. From our scanner, we learned that a coach passenger had suffered a seizure.

- On one trip to California onboard the “Southwest Chief,” we heard the main line dispatcher contact our train with a weather warning that 60 mile an hour winds had been reported to the west of us. We heard our engineer ask the dispatcher if AMTRAK #6 (the east-bound “Zephyr”) had had to stop. Shortly afterwards, the “Chief” came to a stop. There were dark storm clouds overhead, with strong wind and lightning. An announcement was eventually made to the passengers as to why we had stopped. A short time later, we monitored a second high wind warning. About 30 minutes later, the eastbound “Zephyr” went by and the “Chief” finally got underway in a light rain. Later, in the wee hours of the morning, we awoke to find everything quiet and the “Chief” standing still. Turning on the scanner, we heard our engineer ask the dispatcher if he could proceed and was told to wait until after the tracks ahead had been inspected for flooding.

- During another trip west on board the “Chief” we were able to follow an incident occurring in one of the coaches: a woman who was either intoxicated or on drugs had aroused the suspicions of the on-board staff, who were trying to determine if she had a weapon and/or was being disruptive to the other passengers. Authorities at the next station were notified and she was taken off the train when we arrived there.

BY ALL MEANS TAKE A SCANNER ALONG WITH YOU. YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID!

Eric & Pat
 

Eric in East County

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Among railroad scanner enthusiasts, the general consensus is that the little “rubber ducky” antennas that come with most scanners should be replaced, since they are not optimized for railroad frequencies. Based on what I’ve read, the preferred antenna for monitoring railroad radio communications appears to be an adjustable whip that can be “tuned” to a specific frequency by altering its length according to the following formula:

Correct length (in inches) = 2,800 divided by the frequencies in MHz

Using this formula, optimum reception of 160.800 MHz (which is at about the middle of the railroad band) is attained by using an antenna 17.5 inches in length. Since re-tuning the antenna for each new frequency is impractical for my purposes, I compromise by using a 12-inch all-band antenna. The output power of the portable radios used by the train crews is in the range of from 5 to 10 watts, providing coverage of no more than a mile or so. Since most onboard communications are only intended for other nearby radios, my all-band antenna is more than adequate for receiving them.
 

Irelandvegas65

Train Attendant
Joined
Feb 23, 2021
Messages
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Location
Rockford
Based on the feedback here, some say bring it some say no worries if you dont, I reached out to a family member who I recalled has one and I think that might be the best idea, no need to buy, but some fun along the way. Ill confirm what type and frequencies it works on as I get closer to October and ill borrow far enough I advance so I can program and play with it here, maybe even a test run to the viewing platform in Rochelle il just for fun!
 

zephyr17

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Jul 22, 2009
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Washington State
I am okay with the stock rubber ducky antenna onboard. It picks up the crew on the train I am on, the detectors, and communications with very nearby trains ("Looking good on the north side, Amtrak") just fine. Getting the dispatcher clearly can be off and on, but the engineer has to repeat back most things, so I get it on that end, if my reception of the dispatcher is bad.

In the US on Amtrak, I generally keep my scanner locked on the road channel, I don't care about yard stuff or MOW usually. That minimizes, though doesn't eliminate, random squawks and bursts of static. I also turn the squelch up fairly high, as I am interested in things I don't have to try to decode out of static-y bursts.

Bonus on VIA is that the onboard service crew uses radio, not an intercom, to communicate. So on VIA I set up to scan the road, RTC (Canadian for dispatcher), and VIA channels. That VIA OBS channel, also used for communication with the head end, can be really interesting.

If I am out railfanning I use a big magnetic mount antenna that gives me a whole lot more range.
 

Devil's Advocate

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Based on the feedback here, some say bring it some say no worries if you dont, I reached out to a family member who I recalled has one and I think that might be the best idea, no need to buy, but some fun along the way. Ill confirm what type and frequencies it works on as I get closer to October and ill borrow far enough I advance so I can program and play with it here, maybe even a test run to the viewing platform in Rochelle il just for fun!
This sounds like a good middle ground approach. You'll get a chance to try it out and see if you like it before buying your own. In my case the scanner I bought for trains (Uniden Bearcat BC125AT) did not do much for me on Amtrak. It was a lot more interesting on aircraft but most airlines have banned scanners and now it mainly sits in a drawer unless I'm spotting from the car.
 
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zephyr17

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Washington State
If you do borrow it, use earphones while using it onboard. Having it just blast out on its speaker is against Amtrak policy, and the nature of it can be quite annoying to fellow passengers, random squawks and tones, burst of static, static-y, garbled speech. By all means enjoy it, but respect others.

I usually stick an earphone in one ear and not in both, so I can hear what is going around me and carry on a conversation.
 

PaTrainFan

Lead Service Attendant
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May 1, 2017
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497
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Pittsburgh, Pa.
Obviously this is dependent on the type of scanner and quality of the antenna, but what is the typical maximum range? I have considered buying one with the intent of picking up communications from Amtrak where I live, but I am roughly 9 miles away from downtown Pittsburgh. I suspect that's well outside the range.
 

FrensicPic

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LAX
You can get a scanner for something around $100 that is more than adequate for receiving the railroad frequencies. The so-called "NASCAR" scanners will do the job. Even with the stock "rubber ducky" antenna, you are close enough to receive the engineer and conductor and most dispatchers use various mountain-top "repeaters" or remote bases to communicate with the trains. Most of the time, you will be able to copy the dispatcher as well. I use a suction-cup mount antenna mounted in the window; my handheld Garmin GPS is also connected to an external antenna hanging on a suction cup in the window.

A lot of "silence" will be heard but over time, you will hear the trackside defect detectors (heard one "catch" us a couple of times); conversation when the air line parts and the train comes to a sudden stop. On the SWC several years ago, the dispatcher relayed a flash flood warning to the engineer while we were in SE Colorado/NE New Mexico. The rain was pounding down on us! Last October on the Coast Starlight near Ventura as we came to a sudden stop (you could hear the air being dumped) the engineer radioed the standard "Emergency, emergency, emergency" to alert the dispatcher and possible nearby trains (we struck a trespasser).

My typical setup in the bedroom. The scanner is a Uniden BCD396XT (no longer made). The GPS a Garmin GPSMAP 62s (also no longer made) handheld GPS (intended for backpacking).
https://flic.kr/p/P6GYTU
Showing sleeper bedroom window. To the right end you can see the telescoping VHF suction-mount antenna and to its right the external GPS antennas. I normally keep the curtain pulled just enough to cover the hardware in the window! This is way more than what may be needed. For the novice, a handheld scanner with the stock antenna will work fine in most cases.
https://flic.kr/p/CkwZfK
There are slightly less 200 VHF frequencies designated for railroad use each numbered and referred to by train crews as "channels" - channel 30, channel 96, etc. If you program you frequencies and tag them with the AAR Number, it becomes pretty easy to change to the channel currently in use. Use the Amtrak frequency resource mentioned above or, you might hear the crew mention changing to channel # something. You can also scan those channels to try and find the active frequency. By the way, the dispatchers are with the host railroad, not Amtrak (there are places where Amtrak does the dispatching). In any case, all trains communicate on the appropriate "road channel".

Start simple, sit back and enjoy (and be patient). Don't forget an earbud or earphones if you are in coach.
73, John
 

BoulderCO

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Jan 26, 2015
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Longmont Colorado
If you do borrow it, use earphones while using it onboard. Having it just blast out on its speaker is against Amtrak policy, and the nature of it can be quite annoying to fellow passengers, random squawks and tones, burst of static, static-y, garbled speech. By all means enjoy it, but respect others.

I usually stick an earphone in one ear and not in both, so I can hear what is going around me and carry on a conversation.
Excellent advice!
 

Nick Farr

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You can get a scanner for something around $100 that is more than adequate for receiving the railroad frequencies.
A Baofeng UV-5R, a programming cable and a decent antenna can all be had for $50 these days, and probably less if you crawl Facebook marketplace.

You can program that Baofeng to "Dual Watch" the Amtrak "home" frequency and scan only the channels used on your trip.
 

Irelandvegas65

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Feb 23, 2021
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Rockford
I did buy theUV-5R. now to program in and learn the thing between now and the end of September when my journey starts.........
 

Nick Farr

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I did buy theUV-5R. now to program in and learn the thing between now and the end of September when my journey starts.........
If you have the cable, you can just use CHIRP. The US Railroad Frequencies are already built in, it's just a matter of picking the ones that matter for your trip.

Obviously this is dependent on the type of scanner and quality of the antenna, but what is the typical maximum range?
Depends mostly on your antenna and line of sight. A well-tuned VHF antenna on your roof that can be had for $80 will pick up almost anything within line of sight in your valley. You won't have much luck getting traffic on the other side of the mountain unless that subdivision is using repeaters.
 

Irelandvegas65

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Great help getting me started Nick Farr! apple care was able to show/help me get the editor connected and show me how to download and upload to the editor. The download of the file from CHIRP was a bit more than we could figure out together, so I will just edit the list manually. Now figuring out what ones I want ( your suggested list is highly welcomed! ) so I can put together the most useful channels for Empire Builder/Coast Starlight/California Zephyr. my understanding , looking at the link to the track on road list link, the Road frequency is ch 13 , freq 160.305 that would be the main one during the entire CHI to SEA route? is that how that works? or is "road" specific to CHI area?
 

Devil's Advocate

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The channel frequencies are specific to certain regions and change over time.

It would have to be a short ride to use the same channel the whole way. CHI to SEA will change several times.

SegmentHostAAR
Chan
Frequency
EMPIRE BUILDER
Chicago Union Station areaAmtrak Road
Yard
Mechanical
13
42
77
160.305
160.740
161.265
Chicago-MilwaukeeMETRA & CP/Soo Line44160.770
Milwaukee-PortageCP/Soo Line84161.370
Portage-La Crosse (East of Miss. River)CP/Soo Line94161.520
Mississippi River at La Crosse-Mississippi River at HastingsCP/Soo Line44160.770
Mississippi River at La Crosse-Mississippi River at Hastings (Alternate)BNSF39160.690
Mississippi River at Hastings-North of St. Croix JunctionBNSF76161.250
North of St. Croix Junction-St. Paul Union DepotBNSF76161.250
St. Paul Union Depot-Merriam ParkCP44160.770
Merriam Park-St. AnthonyMNNR30160.560
Between Merriam Park/St. Anthony(switching)MNNR30160.560
St. Anthony-Coon RapidsBNSF70161.160
Coon Rapids-StaplesBNSF85161.385
Staples-Fargo NDBNSF87161.415
Fargo-MinotBNSF66161.100
Minot-Berthold NDBNSF46160.800
Berthold-Bainville MTBNSF54160.920
Bainville-Just east of HavreBNSF66161.100
Just east of Havre-WhitefishBNSF76161.250
Whitefish-SandpointBNSF54160.920
Sandpoint-Spokane WA2BNSF76161.250
Switching in SpokaneBNSF
Amtrak
54
62
160.920
161.040
Spokane2-Latah Jct3BNSF76161.250
Latah Jct3-EverettBNSF66161.100
Everett-Edmonds (MP 18)BNSF76161.250
Edmonds-SeattleBNSF70161.160
Seattle
Station Services/Yard
Mechanical
Amtrak
23
45

160.455
160.785
Spokane2-Latah Jct3BNSF76161.250
Latah Jct3-PascoBNSF70161.160
Pasco TerminalBNSF89161.445
Pasco-WashougalBNSF87161.415
Washougal-Portland ORBNSF76161.250
Station Services
Larger stations
Amtrak23160.455
Station Services in Portland4Amtrak15160.350
Switching in PortlandAmtrak62161.040
Notes:
1 - Merriam Park is just south of the St. Paul Union Depot.
2 - Spokane station services may use Channel 23 listed above.
3 - Latah Jct is a few miles west of Spokane.
4 - Channel 16/160.785 in Portland is used by handheld (low power) radios only.​

3/11/2018: Seattle Station services updated courtesy of Martin Caestecker
6/10/2016: Chicago to Hastings updated with data from Curt Fettinger
2/6/2015: Minot ND to Bainville MT updated with data from Curt Fettinger
2/6/2015: Chicago-Milwaukee updated with data from Michael Johnson
1/18/2014: Whitefish to St. Paul updated with data from Tom Rawson
9/22/2014: New segment Coon Rapids-Staples added with data supplied by Larry Milsow
9/14/2014: Newly restored St Paul Union Depot and switching at old Amtrak depot between Merriam Park and St Anthony updated courtesy of Nick Modders​
 
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Alice

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California
I also have the police/fire band programmed for scanning on one button I can turn on or off easily in addition to rail frequencies. When things go south, often they have more info.

For learning to use the scanner, turn it on every time you get in the car on whatever channels (not necessarily rail) are active in your neck of the woods.
 

WWW

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Other things to consider:

Using scanners on railroads is not security critical - no big deal
However going through TSA security at airports may raise eyebrows
Use of scanners in flight is really an issue - use with extreme care here (ear piece headphones absolutely necessary)
Scanners are receivers and not transmitting devices - can't mess with transmissions - but then there are the uneducated - - -

On cruise ships some will not pass muster - especially Carnival Cruise Lines at San Juan PR - they were not very pleasant about it.

As with all scanners - privileged communications is open to monitoring by the public be careful of what you hear and passing it on

Transceivers and Satellite phones are another thing - check to see if the use if OK - verboten - void - don't even think about it !

Most of the police and government frequencies are on a trunking circuit where the signal is on multiple frequencies so you only receive part of
it before changing channels - really hard to follow all the juicy stuff in progress.

In some local areas using a scanner to monitor police activity is illegal - the bad guys out-witting the keystone cops !

But it really is fun to hear the chatter as to why the hell the damn train is late - other than no defects at mile post xxx
Amtrak is really deficient in dispensing information about delays - Ok 20 minutes no big deal but an hour come on give me a break !
YES some trains do pick up time and station stops are often brief - just enough time to keep the delays on the minus side.

And the usual Mission Impossible discloser:
The Secretary will disallow any use of communication devices by the parties
 

Nick Farr

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More specifically, along your entire route:


SegmentChannelFrequencyRoad
Chicago-Milwaukee44160.770METRA
Milwaukee-Portage84161.370CP/Soo
Portage-La Crosse (East of Miss. River)94161.520CP/Soo
Mississippi River at La Crosse-Mississippi River at Hastings44160.770CP/Soo
Mississippi River at La Crosse-Mississippi River at Hastings (Alternate)39160.695BNSF
Mississippi River at Hastings-North of St. Croix Junction76161.250BNSF
North of St. Croix Junction-St. Paul Union Depot76161.250BNSF
St. Paul Union Depot-Merriam Park44160.770CP
Merriam Park-St. Anthony30160.560MNNR
Between Merriam Park/St. Anthony(switching)30160.560MNNR
St. Anthony-Coon Rapids70161.160BNSF
Coon Rapids-Staples85161.385BNSF
Staples-Fargo ND87161.415BNSF
Fargo-Minot66161.100BNSF
Minot-Berthold ND46160.800BNSF
Berthold-Bainville MT54160.920BNSF
Bainville-Just east of Havre66161.100BNSF
Just east of Havre-Whitefish76161.250BNSF
Whitefish-Sandpoint54160.920BNSF
Sandpoint-Spokane WA76161.250BNSF
Switching in Spokane (Amtrak)62161.040BNSF
Switching in Spokane (BNSF)54160.920BNSF
Spokane-Latah Jct76161.250BNSF
Latah Jct-Everett66161.100BNSF
Everett-Edmonds (MP 18)76161.250BNSF
Edmonds-Seattle70161.160BNSF
(EB to Portland) Latah Jct-Pasco70161.160BNSF
(EB to Portland) Pasco Terminal89161.445BNSF
(EB to Portland) Pasco-Washougal87161.415BNSF
(EB to Portland) Washougal-Portland OR76161.250BNSF
Seattle-Tukwilla70161.160BNSF
Tukwilla-Tenino87161.415BNSF
Tenino-North Vancouver66161.100BNSF
North Vancouver-Portland76161.250BNSF
Portland-Coalca27160.515UP
Coalca-Swain96161.550UP
Swain-Calimus30160.560UP
Calimus-Dunsmuir45160.785UP
Dunsmuir-West Haggin80161.310UP
West Haggin-Oakland Coliseum46160.800UP
Emeryville-West Haggin46160.800UP
West Haggin-Rocklin51160.875UP
Rocklin-Vista14160.320UP
Vista-Ocala78161.280UP
Ocala-Weso96161.550UP
Weso-Alazon (Track 1)96161.550UP
Weso-Alazon (Track 2)24160.470UP
Alazon-Smelter24160.470UP
Smelter-Salt Lake City57160.965UP
Salt Lake City-Midvale57160.965UP
Midvale-Provo42160.740UP
Provo-Helper23160.455UP
Helper-Grand Junction54160.920UP
Grand Junction-Bond23160.455UP
Bond-Winter Park54160.920UP
Winter Park-Moffat Tunnel97161.565UP
Moffat Tunnel-MP 17.423160.455UP
MP 17.4-Prospect14160.320UP
Prospect-Denver39160.695UP
Denver-West Pinneo66161.100BNSF
West Pinneo-E. Heartwell70161.160BNSF
E. Heartwell-Lincoln54160.920BNSF
Lincoln-MP 466.487161.415BNSF
MP 466.4-Halpin53160.905BNSF
Halpin-CP 175039160.695BNSF
CP 1750-Galesburg51160.875BNSF
Galesburg-Aurora85161.385BNSF
Aurora-Chicago66161.100BNSF
 

Nick Farr

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StationChannelFrequency
Chicago Amtrak Road13160.305
Chicago Amtrak Yard42160.740
Chicago Amtrak Mechanical77161.265
Amtrak Pacific NW Switching Channel62161.040
Seattle Amtrak Station Services23160.455
Seattle Amtrak Mechanical45160.785
Portland Amtrak Station Services15160.335
Larger Station Amtrak Services23160.455
Oakland UP Yardmaster66161.100
Oakland Mechanical22160.440
Oakland Yard51160.875
Salt Lake City66161.100
Amtrak OBS ChannelN/A452.900
Amtrak OBS ChannelN/A457.900
 

Nick Farr

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If you wanted to just program the ones that will be in use on your route and hit the "scan" button every so often this is the table to use and scan against:

ChannelFrequencyTimes used on EB>CS>CZ route
13160.3051
14160.3202
15160.3351
22160.4401
23160.4555
24160.4702
27160.5151
30160.5603
39160.6953
42160.7402
44160.7703
45160.7852
46160.8003
51160.8753
53160.9051
54160.9206
57160.9652
62161.0402
66161.1008
70161.1605
76161.2508
77161.2651
78161.2801
80161.3101
84161.3701
85161.3852
87161.4154
89161.4451
94161.5201
96161.5503
97161.5651
 
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